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Full text of "St Andrew's College Review, Midsummer 1922"

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^summer 

1922 



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Ryrie Bros. Limited 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS 
AND SILVERSMITHS 

special attention given to Class Pins and 
College Insignia 

SEND FOR OUR BOOKLET : 

" CLUB AND CLASS PINS." 

134-136-138 Yonge Street 
TORONTO 



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College Men 

who know VALUE 

—who know QUAUTY. STYLE and 
TAILORING, buy their clothes at 
DUNFIELDS' — where they know 
they are sure of getting SOCIETY 
BRAND — the best clothes value in 
Canada — all wool materials, newest 
styles, hand-tailoring. 



Suits, 



Sport Suits, Top Coats 
$30 to $60 



DUNFIELD HABERDASHERY 

— represents the last word in style combined 
with good taste — and is reasonable priced — 
always. 



1 02 Yonge 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



FOUNTAIN PENS 



The Salesman in our 

Fountain Pen Depart- 
i ment will be ijlad to 

1 help you select the 

pen best suited for 

your hand. 

It is surprising^ how 
much easier it is to 
write with a pen that 
suits your style of 
writing". 

Call in some day, and 
test our pens. You 
will be sure to find one 
that exactly suits you. 

t| lMil]® SiJm omited : 

8-14 Wellington St., W. Toron 



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UHniillUl]!!-!! 




61 Bloor West 



North 8252 



A shley 



and 



Crippen 

Photographs 



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"The cut o'them" 



IT takes a good cutter to turn out 
the suit that a particular man 
will wear. 

IT takes a good cutter to give the 
lines and style to suits that St. 
Andrew's boys desire. 

T^HE Boys' Clothing department 
-'■ in this Store specializes in the 
"cut " of suits and overcoats. 



The Robert Simpson Co. Ltd. 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLICC.K RHX IKW 






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" BUILD STRONG " 

Strength may be Moral, Mental 
or Muscular — 

All are qualities of men of might. Nature's own 
food builds strong bodies. 



For '' Milk of Quality " phone us 



J College 2040 



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RATHBONE 

p — and Co. » 
92 Yonge Street 

Iinporlers of 

Exclusive Men's Wear 

FLANNEL and DUCK 

TROUSERS 

SPORT SHIRTS 

and 

BATHING SUITS 

Phone Main 2928 



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THE TORONTO 

TROPHY-CRAFT 

COMPANY 

Designers and Manceaciurers of 

CLASS PINS 
PENNANTS 
SWEATER CRESTS 
F R A T. PINS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 
M EDALS AND 
TROPHIES 



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sts: 



special designs submitted 
free of charge 

171 1 ROYAL BANK BUILDING 
KING & YONGE STS. 

TORONTO 

PHONE ADELAIDK 1731 



ST. AXDRKW'S COLLEGE RE\"IE\V 



TRUE TO HIS WORD 

He Studied Hard and Won a Planet 



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" Daddy promised me a new 
Planet bicycle if I passed my 
examinations — and I did.'' 

Surely no Daddy could offer 
any better inducement for his boy 
or g-irl to study hard and pass on 
the promise of a new bicycle. 

It's time now to consider 
getting- that wheel, we have a 
nice new stock just the latest 
design and you should see the 
PLANET before buying else- 
where. 



THE PLANET BICYCLE CO. ^ 



69-71 QUEEN STREET E. 

PHONE MAIN 3197 



TORONTO 



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BACON 
LARD 



OTxe Whyte 

Packing Co. 

Limited 

66 Front St. East, Toronto 




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ELLIS BROS. 



LIMITED 



DIAMOND IMPORTERS AND 
JEWELLERS 

96-98 YONGE ST. !J 



i M 

1 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, 

JEWELLERY, CLOCKS, 

CHINA, SILVERWARE, 

AND ART GOODS 



Highest Quality 

Newest Styles 

Best Values 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



"For Your Digestion's Sake" 

you are recommended to use 

BERMALINE 
BREAD 

Dr. Andrew Wilson, writing- in the "British Medical 
Journal, ' states — 

'•'This Bread should be eaten by all who are i>i any 
way effected bv digestive ailments.'' 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



NASMITHS LIMITED 

Phone Main 6535 






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U — PRINTING 




^nifaersitp of Toronto ^refis; 

Toronto 

^1 Solicits the orders of Student Societies for 



Invitations, Tickets, 

Programmes, At-Home 

Cards, etc. 



BINDING — 



IN ALL 

ITS 

BRANCHES 



R. J. HAMILTON, B.A. 

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Manager 



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ST. AxNDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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DEER PARK GARAGE 

AND LIVERY l-TD. 



North 1300 

Cars 

For 

Dances, 

Weddings, 

Etc. 

A Call Will Send a Car 
To Your Door in a Jiff}- 



Canada's Copying 

Leading and 

Outdoor Enlarging 

Photographers A Specialty 



Galhraith 

Photo Co. 

Carlton and Yonge Sts. 
Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6725 



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Here's to the Boys! \ 



We were young once ourselves 

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The BRITISH AMERICAN OIL COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Branches in principal towns and cities in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan a7id Alberta 



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ST. AXDF^KWS COLI P:GE REXIKW 




At. St. Andrew's Tuck 
and Most Good Stores 



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Satisfies 

ALWAYS 



NHflUGHLINS 

GINGER 
ALE 



HYGEIA BEST BEVERAGES 



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IMPERIAL BANK 

OF CANADA 

Capital and Reserve $14,500,000 



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Going back through the years since St. 
Andrew's opened, students of all years 
1 will rememberthe Imperial Bank. You are 
proud of the College record We are proud 
of the Bank's record. 



The nearest Branch to St. Andrew's College is 
at the corner of Yonge and Bloor Sts. 



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B. E. Howard, Manager. 
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Fishing 
Sailing 
Shooting 
Camping 
First Aid 
Swimming 
Life Saving 
Fancy Diving 
Canoe Cruises 
Nature Study 
Sailing Cruises 
Manual Training 




Music 

Games 

Boxing 

Archery 

Canoeing 

Dramatics 

Wrestling 

Woodcraft 

Gymnastics 

Volley Ball 

Photography 

Atliletic Sports 



Camp Kagana/ong 

A SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS 



St. Andrew's Boys at Camp 1921 




Applegath, A. 


Lumbers, L. 


Applegath, W. 


Lentz, W. 


Allen, R. 


Macdonald, W 


Bristol, W. 


McLean, D. 


Brown, J. 


Macl^ennan, E 


Brown, A. 


McMurtv, W. 


Barber. D. 


Xelles, R. 


Blauvelt, F. 


Rolph, G. 


Craig, E. 


Scythes, B. 


Carrick, J. 


Shortley, J. 


Carrick, D. 


Skeaff, S. 


Carrick, A. 


Slemin, H. 


C lebrook. G. 


Smilv, P. 


Easton, W. 


Smart, E. 


Ellswortli E. 


Stollmeyer, R. 


Fair E. 


Stollmeyer, A. 


Fleck, W. 


Stollmeyer, A. 


Grant, R. 


Temple, C. 


Hoops, H. 


Turnbull, J. 


Hoops, H. 


Watts, L. 


King, B. 


Worts, J. 




Smith, H. 



As the Camp has a full registration 
early each year it should be distinctly 
understood that in fairness to former 
campers all applications can receive 
consideration only in the order in 
which they may come to hand. 

For illustrated booklet and further 
injormation address 

E. A. CHAPMAN, 

St. Andrew's College. 




ST. a.\drp:\v's collec;e rkxikw 



Kent BIdg., Toronto 




mWlscj/^ ■ SAVE 510 

Bartlet BIdg., M'indsor 



Clothes 

preferred by 

College 

Men 



The i)roof that we give GREATER 
VALUE is well exemplified in our 
showing of all wool garments in 
styles approved as correct for 
young men. 



Suits, Sport 
Suits, and 
Top Coats 

At Our Upstairs Prices 

$18 to $45 

If you buy by comparison of 
value \'0U will wear Pascoes 
Clothes — -thev are sold tO vou at 
prices FREE FROM HIGH 
RENTS AXD SELLING EX- 
PENSES and guaranteed to give 
service and satisfaction. 




PAscoES 

^ CLOTHES SHOP 

' Second Floor Kenl Building - 
Corner YONGE ami RICHMOND STREETS. 



^i)t ^t ^nbretti's; College 

Review 




iUiligummer, 1922 



lEMtorial 36oar^ 

MR. A. R. RAMSEY 
R. H. ANDERSON F. R. DAYMENT 

J. E. HOWELL J. V. RUSSELL 

B. B. KING W. A. BEER 

K. B. CARSON E. R. McLELLAND 

Business /iDanaoers 



J. A. CAMERON 
R. J. CAMERON 



W. E. EARLE 

W. G. McMURTRY 



Issued by the Editorial Board 
EVERY CHRISTMAS, EASTER AND MIDSUMMER 



iilibsummer, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTEXTS 

The Rp:vii:w Stafp' Frontispiece 

Editorial 13 

A May Morxixc; 1(3 

Xer\ E And How To Acquire It 18 

Radio 19 

Spooks 22 

A I)lSTIX(;UISHED \'lSITOR 24 

Experiences Of A Collector 26 

Sprixg 28 

Emixext Axdreaxs 29 

The Brookes Sisters 30 

The School 31 

Cricket 50 

Our Old Boys 73 

Exchaxges 78 

Skits 80 



St. Andrew's College Review 

flDiC)6ummer, 1922 



EDITORIAL. 

The use of superlatives is not over-boastful when applied to 
the success of this past school year; but lest it appear in excess, 
we carefully confine ourselves to a strictly honest consideration of 
what the year with its developments has brought. 

To begin with, our rug'by team forged its way steadily to suc- 
cessive victories. At the close of the season our first team held 
the Little Big- Four Championship, having beaten Bishop Ridley 
College, Trinity College School and Upper Canada College. The 
junior teams, also, had their share of victories winning a surpris- 
ing majority of their games. 

Prize Day in November was a gala event. His Excellency, 
Baron Byng of Vimy unveiled a splendid bronze tablet in memory 
of the Old Boys who fell overseas. The cadet corps was in attend- 
ance as a guard of honour. The prizes were presented by His Ex- 
cellency and Lady Byng. 

On account of consistent practice, the excellent material for 
hockey was developed into a team whose record will go down in 
school history. Not only did the crimson and white win the cham- 
pionship of their group, but they went even farther. Queen's Uni- 
versity HL's went down before us; as also did Collingwood. In 
the liest game of junior hockey of the season we were eliminated by 
St. Mary's, but only after half an hour's hard fought overtime. 

During the winter a Dramatic Club was organized. Towards 
the end of March it presented a scene from Twelfth Night. The 
success of this venture, which, by the way, was the first of its kind, 
was very much to be commended. 

Later came the Assault-at-Arms, and the events were all con- 
tested in a keen manner. 

The Cadet Corps has completed its best season in years, if the 
opinion of the inspecting oflftcer is regarded. Then, also, the 

13 



14 ST. ANDRKWS COI.LECK RE\"IK\V 

parades to church and twice with the 48th demonstrated to every- 
body that here was a corps worthy of notice. 

We regret that the REVIEW goes to pi-ess before the result of 
tlie cricket season has been determined. Our material is of a kind 
to deserve confidence; but forecasting the outcome is such folly 
that we let the expression of our earnest hopes suffice at present. 

In this brief resume of the year's activities, we discern a record 
hardly equalled in the past. If one looks ahout for a reason he 
fails to find anything outstanding. If consistent efforts for the 
good of the school with secondary regard for self; if a hearty co- 
operation and loyalty between, not only the masters and l>oys, ])ut 
also the seniors and younger boys ; if the sane optimism held by all 
from the Headmaster to the youngest, has had these results, then we 
can look back on the everj^-day life at St. Andrew's College as an 
experience of which to be proud, and the means of moulding the 
character of those who will one day lead in the various activities 
of the future. 

F. Roper Dayment. 



Again, we have to record the passing of a distinguished Gover- 
nor of the School in the death of Sir John Craig Eaton, who died 
on March 30th, 1922, after several months' illness. The pul)lic 
activities of the late Sir John Eaton were almost too numerous to 
enumerate. They have been so fittingly chronicled in other publi- 
cations that it would hardly seem fitting to mention them in detail 
m our school paper. Suffice it to say, that his removal by death 
constitutes a great public loss and leaves a gap not easy to fill. He 
joined the Board of Governors of St. Andrew's College some nine 
years ago and his counsel and friendly interest in our activities 
will I e much missed by those responsible for the welfare of the 
school. 

To Lady Eaton and her family the Review respectfully tend- 
ers the very sincere sympathy of the school. 



This is the last number of the Review for the present school 
vear. Many of the members of our Editorial Board will be saying- 
farewell to St. Andrew's soon after this number is issued. We wish 
them the best of luck, and take this opportunity of thanking them 
lor the work they have done in making the school paper a success. 



ST. ANDRHWS COLLEGE REX'IEW 



15 



The Review is entirely a school-boys' magazine. It is not written 
or controlled by any members of the teaching- staff, or by "old 
boys". The experience gained by the members of our Editorial 
Board, we believe, will prove valuable to them in professional or 
business life. Once more we extend our thanks and best wishes to 
those who have had their fii'st experience in journalism with the 
St. Andrew's College REVIEW. 




A DAILY \'ISITOR AXD SOME OF HIS BEST CUSTOMERS. 



A MAY MORNING. 

It is a May morning-; the sun has just risen and is pouring in 
through my window. My bed is not very comfortable, and I am 
very hot— so I get up, look out, and decide to wander around the 
grounds. 

It is a beautiful day. Dew glistens on the l)ranches ; a squirrel 
runs up the tree, evidently hunting for a morning meal. He sees 
me, and chattering- excitedly, jumps to another branch. A red 
breast, no doubt having heard of the proverb about the early bird, 
pulls painstakingly at a fat dew-w'orm, who does not seem to 
relish being a breakfast food for anybody, and is pulling hard the 
other way. I chuckle and walk on. 

Here and there an old yellow dandelion is popping ui3 — even a 
weed looks pretty this morning, but I think how long the poor old 
yellow head will last when I get after it with my detention roller. 
An old jack-rabbit, who has been out for the night's promenade, 
is getting- home late. Some amateur gardener's little green shoots 
are ruined. I sit down. 

The morning haze is clearing and I think of my home-town 
down on the seaboard. How the tugs would be tooting! How the 
old grey tramp boats would be pulling leisurely down the harbour, 
leaving- a dirty stream of black smoke behind ; the gulls shrieking- 
over the mud flats and fishermen's weirs, watching for the unwary 
fish. The haze clears, and the early morning rush for the tide is 
done, the harbour is peaceful, and all that is left is the long dull 
roar of the sea on the break-water. 

My thoughts turn to our summer house, how would it look this 
morning? "The shadowy pine"; the tall firs; the purple hills; the 
old trout jumping and raising dashes of silver on the surface of 
the placid lake; the old bull moose splashing and calling at the far 
end of it, the slinking fox ; the partridge drumming on the granite 
boulder; the bull-frog's croak down underneath the landing stage: 
ihe little falls, splashing on the pebbles ; the caw of the old crow — 
one month more and I'll be there. Again my thoughts wander. 

It is an old house covered with honeysuckle ; the rooster is 
giving his morning call ; the hired man, looking very sleepy and 
unwashed, wanders in from the barn with a pail of milk. The boy 
is hitching up a fine old chestnut to the buggy; m\' grandfather, 

16 



ST. ANDREWS COLLECP: RE\IE\V 



17 



who is a doctor, is about to go on his morning- rounds. I think of 
him driving- down the long- orchard . . . when something- hits me 
on the neck, it is a tennis ball, and it has come from the Rosedale 
courts, I throw it back with a smile . . . some g-irls do rise early I 
and I'm g-lad I washed my face before I came out. I climb the 
fence ; it is a May morning- . . . It is spring- ! 

R. H. Anderson. 




LIBRARIAN'S 1921-22 



"NERVE, AND HOW TO ACQUIRE IT." 

Nerve, in American vernacular, means an unsusceptibility to 
insult, assault and asphalt. It may be defined as individual defiancr 
of the universe including- pai'ents, the king- and the planet Jupiter. 
It is possessed in a greater degree by the young than the old. It 
is of the young that I shall digress at present, and I will endeavour 
to show how this great, defective asset, nerve, is almost priceless 
to the ambitious school-boy. 

There comes a time in the life of every inmate of a l)oarding- 
school when he desires to become a prefect; it is only human nature 
to want to be a fool and get away with it — and prefects get away 
with it. On examining the biographies of successful prefects, as 
well as those of Napoleon and Hannibal, it will be found that nerve 
is indispensable to achieving success, therefore those boys who 
dream of being prefects and who do not already possess nerve find 
it necessary to go about acquiring- it; this can be done in various 
ways, but the most facile manner of taking upon oneself a cloak of 
rhinoceras hide, is to borrow things without asking for them, such 
as golf-clubs, brilliantine and combs. 

At first the ambitious boy will find his neck growing red when 
he is "told off" by the owners of the articles which he appropriates, 
but if he be a genuinely aml)itious boy he will not grow red around 
the ears, but will continue upon his path of glory with the non- 
chalance of a plumlber at a steam-fitters' ball. 

After eleven lessons in borrowing, he may rise to the next great 
course which consists of picking up the photographs of girl-friends 
belonging to his fellow students and commenting on them thus, — 
"A mess," "Who is she, your grandmother?" "I guess it's a good 
picture of her!" This little act besides endearing him to his fellows 
will develop his critical faculties considerably. 

Having shattered the altars of beauty he may proceed to the 
third stage of development, viz., the acquiring of his certificate in 
"Bawling-out." He should hold "Telling-off" parties daily (thf 
masters are always good material for these social events, but any 
harmless boy who happens to have an impediment in his speech is 
a very good subject). By this time the ambitious boy will be im- 
mensely popular and if he is a member of the first hockey and rugby 
teams and a lieutenant in the Cadet Corps, he will doubtless be 
made a prefect. K. B. C. 



RADIO. 

At last radio has inoculated the public with its serum of joy. 
We can now lounge in a big Morris chair and listen to grand-opera, 
popular music and songs, university lectures, sermons, sporting 
results, press news and countless other topics which to the public 
may take on the form of either an amusement or an education. 
Radio-telephone is not, as most think, a new invention. It is, on 
the contrary, thirty-seven years old. A great numl^er of amateurs 
have had sets in this city for some years. Thanks to advertise- 
ments everyone is now interested. 

The College has not escaped the radio epidemic which is bound 
to get everyone, no matter how old-fashioned, sooner or later. The 
boys have organized a club with the object of setting up a two- 
stage regenerative set to receive the concerts. There was a repre- 
sentative elected from each Form who in turn appointed their 
officers. Dayment of Upper Yl., Drury from the Toronto VI., and 
Stephenson from the McGill group, could not stand for appoint- 
ment owing to studies. The lot of president then fell on Dyment 
with Rennie as secretary. The other representatives are as fol- 
lows :—Kirkpatrick of IV. A., Gore of IV. B., Sprott of III. A., 
Parker of III. B., Ferguson II. of II, and Wright of I. 

Many people do not know the distinction between radio and 
radiophone. The former is just the modern word for wireless, while 
radiophone, which is the voice transmitter, is the new name for 
wireless telephone. The same receiving apparatus is used for both 
voice and code signals. As everyone is now interested in radio- 
phone only, I will give a brief summaiy of its history. 

In 1885, Sir Wm. Preece transmitted the human voice a dis- 
tance of 440 yards, but within four years this range had been 
increased to eight miles. A. F. Collins also an Englishman, carried 
on further experiments about the year 1900, and although not in- 
creasing the range he perfected the articulation. At the same 
time Ruhmer, Telefunken and Fessenden were experimenting in 
Germany. The last named, in 1907, increased the range to one 
hundred miles. In Italy during the following year Majorana, using 
an arc, transmitted three hundred miles. The arc system was im- 
proved by Dwyer, and in 1910 the Americans obtained a range of 
six hundred miles. The Americans, under Lee De Forest, then 

19 



20 ST. AM)KF:\\'.S COl.LKCK Ri:\ii:\\ 

took a huge stride forward by inventing the vacuum tube (V.T.)- 
This revolutionized radio for both receiving and transmitting. In 
1915, they carried on successful voice communication over a dis- 
tance of 2,500 miles. Since then they have held conversation be- 
tween New York and Honolulu a distance of 5,000 miles. 

As the radiophone grew out of wireless, I will give the elemen- 
tary principle upon which the latter was based. Hertz, a 
German, laid the foundation on which Signor Marconi and Sir Wm. 
Preece developed their wireless. 

Hertz charged a Leyden jar, which is a condenser, with elec- 
tricity and on bringing the two poles into proximity a spark w^as 
produced between them. He took a step further by connecting a 
coil of wire between the two poles. On re-charging the jar he dis- 
covered that the electricity would now run alternately from one 
side to the other. The reason for this is that the positive side of 
the charge flows around through the coil to the negative side. 

This leaves what was originally the positive side vacant, or 
negative. Then the action reverses, till all the electricity is used up 
owing to the heating of the wire by this energy and the radiation 
of electro-magnetic waves. This circuit (a condenser shunted 
across a coil), is known as the closed oscillation circuit. It is called 
"closed" because the two plates are only separated by a small dis- 
tance. Although this circuit will handle a large amount of power 
it is a bad radiator. To overcome this they used an open oscillation 
circuit which is a good radiator, but can not handle an excessive 
supply of power. You now see that by combining these two cir- 
cuits one can obtain the desired results. A good example of the 
combination is seen in the simple crystal set employing a loose- 
coupler. The primary being the coil in the open circuit and the 
aerial and ground acting as the two plates of the condenser, which 
are separated by a great distance. The secondary, with its con- 
denser in shunt, forms the closed circuit. 

In any oscillation circuit to increase the capacity means to 
increase the wave length, but decrease the frequency. This brings 
up two new points. What do wave lengths and frequency mean? 
Radio waves correspond to those made when a stone is dropped into 
a pond. As you all know, weaves are radiated outwards in all di- 
rections. The same applies to radio waves and one wave length, 
or cycle, is the distance from the crest of one wave to the crest 
of the next. The number of these waves produced a second is the 
frequency. As the velocity of radio waves are the same as light 
waves, that is 30 million meters per second, we may form the 



ST. AXDRKWS COIJ.KCE KFA'IF.W 21 

following simple equation AXf=V or wave length X frequency = 
velocity. We can now find either the A or the f w^hen the other 
is given. 

I will now describe the function of the more important parts 
of the set which we are installing here. For best receiving results 
one should use a single wire, number 12 phosphor bronze, erected 
at right angles to the transmitting zone and some distance from 
electric wires and trees. The aerial does not attract lightning any 
more than does the eave-troughing and wiring throughout the 
house. It is necessary, however, to have a lightning switch so as 
to keep within the fire insui ance regulations. Too much emphasis 
can not be laid on the aerial and ground circuit, but as it is too 
big a subject to treat in detail here, we must go on to the vacuum 
tube, or audion as it is sometimes called. It is the most sensitive 
instrument known to science, although it is very simple in con- 
struction. The bulb contains three elements, the grid, plate and 
filiament. Imagine the filiament to be a fountain with the electrons 
as water. As the spray leaves the filiament it is drawn into the 
olate which acts like a suction tube. This is run by the suction 
pump or "B" battery. You see that there \^'ould then be a con- 
tinuous flow of water or current which would hold the diaphram 
down to the magnets in the head phone. To overcome this the 
grid acts like a shutter which is opened or closed by the current 
coming in through the aerial and thus varies the amount of current 
reaching the phones. This allows the diaphram to vibrate and we 
have our signals. 

Although it is a bit late in the year to begin things on a large 
scale, it is hoped that the boys next term will get busy and back up 
the radio scheme. Dyment. 



SPOOKS. 

I have read about spiritualism at diffe]-ent times and have 
sadly failed to convince myself that J can, by a little effort and the 
expense of a small amount of money, speak to Moses or to the spii-it 
of any famous man. 

Perhaps Moses could help us untangle some of the many inter- 
national problems of to-day, because, even if times have changed 
since his death, he has surely kept himself informed about the con- 
ditions of things on earth. There ai'e some students who could 
speak to him in his native language if the medium did not, by acci- 
dent, translate it into modern English. Possibly two or three 
energetic mediums could have turned the tide of affairs at Genoa. 

Of course, there is this great doubt : We have been told from 
beyond the veil (now so sadly torn?) that they have still their 
whiskey and sodas and such earthly enjoyments, and is it not 
possible that some of these great minds of othei- ages have weak- 
ened and allowed their ethereal bodies to become debauched and 
low spirited? We fear that Alexander the Great may not have 
learned the lesson taught him by his last midnight party in Baby- 
lon. 

But let us be optimistic. Surely they do not weaken in the after- 
world; surely their morals are as perfect as we would have them. 
Then let us take up a collection, go to a good medium, and get some 
of those old-time leaders to settle the more hazy details in our an- 
cient history books. Perhaps some deceased scientist, freed from 
the narrow bounds of human thought, can make clear to us the true 
nature of electricity. Why! Perhaps some all-seeing spook can 
even tell me where I can find that cricket ball that I lost the other 
day. 

What sublime comfort there is for the bereaved son in the 
thought that his dear mother is near him in the ether, living the 
same old life — why should she have been taken away from him so 
suddenly to leave his home empty and cheerless if she was just 
going to live as before in another plane, a little more happy? He 
knows she would rather be unhappy and be with him. Perhaps he 
can speak to her! What good will that ever do him? Will she 
show him the right way to live? We have as yet received no 
advice from across the bar. 



ST. ANDREWS COI.I.KCF. RK\IK.\V 



23 



It has been wisely said that any belief is valuable in propor- 
tion as it brings good to the believer. So far spiritualism has been 
the cause of nervous breakdowns, insanity and wretched suicides. 
(Of course, it has brought money to mediums and lecturers on the 
subject.) 

The spiritualists tell stories of many weird psychic phenomena 
such as table-rapping, the knocking together of glasses, movinr 
lights and such unnatural occurrences, and on this they build up a 
theory and a religion that would give men communication with the 
dead. The lecturers tell stories of a slimy ectoplasm that exudes 
from the body of the medium and causes these disturbances. 
What can be more impossible than that a body made up of semi- 
liquid substances should be able to apply a force great enough to 
lift a table! I have read that one lecturer said the medium gained 
in weight by as much as the weight of the body lifted. The same 
lecturer said that this ectoplasmic muscular arm of the medium 
rested on the floor near the body lifted to act as a lever. In this 
case the weight of the table would be transferred by the arm to the 
floor and the medium would not gain in weight. The photographs 
they show of fairies in the air neai- mediums, portray the fairies 
as having hair very much like the bobbed-haired toy dolls of to-day. 

The public is only allowed to attend seances held in the dark, 
and there is always the possibility of tricke]'y. We will believe m 
spiritualism and its spooks when its exponents come out into the 
light and show us something tangible, and until then I think the 
course of spiritualism will run, like its seances, in the dark. 

Beer. 




ST. AXDREW.S V. DO\'ERCOURT 



A DISTINGUISHED VISITOR. 

The subject of this short narrative would suggest the visit of 
a very respected and highly revered personage to some humble 
dwellings, or perhaps that of a great soldier, or statesman, to a 
town or city, but the visitor I shall tell you of is the Blue bird. And 
as some of my readers may not know this bird very intimately, it 
may be of interest to give a short description of its life and habits. 

Of a shy disposition, the Blue bird shuns, rather than seeks 
man's society; he is most often to be seen near deserted buildings, 
or along quiet country roads. This spring, however, a snow-storm 
coming suddenly, late in April, drove several newly arrived birds to 
the shelter of our house and surrounding out-buildings. Snow 
birds and blue birds were among their number, but the blue birds 
ignored the crumbs which I threw out for their special benefit, and 
which were speedily picked up by their small fi'iends. Instead, 
they busied themselves in picking the buds off the grape vines, 
which grow over the verandah roof, seemingly quite satisfied with 
this form of sustenance. 

This visit gave me a splendid opportunity to study my bird 
friends, as they flitted about from branch to branch. Contrary to 
the colour, implied in its name, the blue bird is not all blue : 
this being true only of its larger cousin, the Indigo Bunting, but 
it has a rich brownish red breast much the same shade as the robin. 
The back is a very beautiful dark blue, while the head seems almost 
black, so deep is the colouring. 

They have no real song, but their merry chirp has a cheerful 
note and seems to denote their happy dispositions. All through the 
mating season, and after the brilliantly coloured male has chosen his 
more sombre mate, they are seldom seen, being busy building the 
nest and in hatching and feeding the young. I have seen but two 
nests, both of which were snugly built in a hollow fence post, and 
contained four eggs. Like all young birds, the baby blue bird ma- 
tures very rapidly, and about the early part of July is capable of 
taking care of itself. 

The blue bird migrates to the south quite late in the fall, often 
not before the first severe frosts; but returns north again, early 
enough to be among the spring harbingers, and as such receives 
a warm welcome. They travel in small flocks, and are often seen 

24 



ST. ANDRKW'S C'OLLECiE RKXIEW 



25 



during a rest from their long- flight picking the dried berries off the 
bushes in the gardens. 

To my mind, the blue bird is one of the prettiest and most in- 
teresting of our summer visitors, and is certainly distinguished 
from his other bird friends by his unrivalled plumage. His habits 
are interesting, and his life is useful, and so I advise bird lovers to 
study my favourite bird. As he flies swiftly here and there he looks 
like a patch of blue from the sky, and in spite of my praise I am 
sure he is still an unaffected and quiet bird friend. 

T. V. Wilson. 




"SCOTCH FOURESOME" 



EXPERIENCES OF A COLLECTOR. 

AUCTION SALE 

at 10 a.m. sharp. 

WATTS' CORNERS. N.J. 

At 10 a.m. to-morrow morning, July 15, there will 

be sold at auction the entire household effects of Mrs. 

Josiah B. Wyndham. 

Jacob Small, Auctioneer. 

The above announcement greeted my eagle eye as I danced 
amiably over the pages of the Newthorpe Weekly Guardian one July 
day last summer. 

Newthorpe it may be stated is in New Jersey — a broadminded 
and open statement. Watts' Corners is exacly four and three- 
quarter miles (by field) from Newthorpe. Now, having the geog- 
raphy of the town firmly in our minds, let us proceed. 

The following morning, 8.45 a.m., to be precise, I ambled to- 
wards the main road, there to await the so-called "Public Service" 
car which occasionally sauntered to and fro between Newthorpe. 
Watts' Corners and Dorley, the next town. Having waited thirty- 
four and a half minutes, I saw the vehicle in question heaving in 
sight along the road. After a few more minutes I found myself 
seated in it, and was, you might say, "whizzed off" towards my 
destination. Arriving there at about 10.35, I set out to discover 
the residence of the Wyndham family. On inquiring I ascertained 
that if you took the road by the old Roxley place, and turned to the 
left at Saunders' barn, it was just "over a piece from Punch am 's 
second wheat field." Armed with this astounding information T 
began to look for the old "Roxley Place." This I eventually found 
was a somewhat dilapidated colonial mansu-^n turned by an ambi- 
tious and enterprising gentleman into a gai'age. From him I ob- 
tained some logical directions, and when I reached the scene of 
action the sale was in full swing, and a "fine strong bureau" of 
bird's-eye maple and walnut was under the hammer. This was 
knocked down to a stout female in black braided serge for $8.45. 
The next lot was a heterogeneous collection or kitchenware, china, 
books and pictures, on which I rashly bid 15 cents and found my- 

26 



ST. ANDREWS COLLECE RE\IEW 27 

self the owner. Putting- this aside for further examination. 1 
turned niy attention to the next article, an aged and wheezy organ, 
seemingly the most attractive piece in the sale. This sold for $11.85 
to the town autocrat a hardware merchant named Simpkin. 

After this I began to examine the people around me, but soon 
turned niy attention back to the platform for a pair of brass 
candlesticks and a picture that might have been a "Baxter" were 
being disposed of. Feeling reckless I paid 60 cents for these and 
placed them with my former bargain. Soon a heated dispute arose 
as to whether "Eb" Webster or "Jem" Whitaker bid $1.70 first on 
a "chiny" closet, but someone saved the situation by bidding $1.75 
and getting it, both the contestants being too surprised to bid. 
The real excitement came, however, when "that there spirit incy- 
bator" of Sam Wyndham's was put up. Half the state, it seems, 
had intentions of incubating chickens that following fall. Occas- 
ionally, through the noise you could hear the auctioneer's voice: 
"Now, then, ladies and gentillmen, am I only bid fower dollars and 
twenty cents for this here fine incybator? Why, Sam Wyndham 
paid twenty fer it. How do I know it. Eb Webster? You needn't 
be so soi'e l^ecause yuh lost the cupboard. I know it because I was 
station agent when it came, and had to look after the invoice. Naow, 
then, ladoes and gentillmen, that's right, five dollars, five, ten," and 
so on. Numerous other sales followed. None of which intei'ested 
me particularly except possibly, that of a set of pink rosebud chiny, 
over which two old women were haggling and calling each other 
names between bids. For example, "What 'ud you do with it, Lizy? 
Now, where 'ud you put it?" "I have a good sight better place for 
it than your have, Mary Whyton, even if you have got a real lace 
table cloth left ye by your great Aunt Sue." The lace table cloth 
lady finally got the set for $1.35. It was now well after twelve, so 
I gathered up the books, candlesticks and pictures and started back 
to Newtlioi'p, having had an enjoyable, if not profitable, morning. 

ASPDEN. 



SPRING. 

Behold I the monkish cloisters, dim with age 
And darkened by the sleet and rain and snow; 

The stones, worn deep by tread of many a sage, 
With spring's bright sunlight now are all aglow. 

Within the church where all was grey and grim, 
And long dull shadows glanced across the stones, 

Thi'ough stained glass from which the face of Him 
Shed its soft radiance on long mouldering bones. 

All this is changed and now broad golden bars 

Pour through the great arched windows to the ground, 

Brightening once more the heavy carved chairs 
And mocking the great doorway iron bound. 

While in the belfry clangs the ancient bell. 

Calling the hamlet to an early mass; 
The monks, whose pious voices softly swell 

The scented air uprising from the grass. 

And now they enter, kneel upon the floor. 
Lifting pale faces to the vaulted dome, 

Chanting long prayers, as they have done before, 
In glorious praise that once more spring has come. 

T. F. ASPDEN. 




■\VE\E BEEN WORKING ON THE ROLLER 
28 



EMINENT ANDREAJNS. 



NURSE MYERS. 

To be modern in our metaphor we shall call her, 
not the "Lady with the Lamp," but the "Lady with the 
Daylo." She is a marvel in her knowledge of the ti'ibula- 
tions through which youth passes ; and it is the mental balm which 
she supplies to wounded spirits wallowing in detention, as well 
as the excellent panaceas which she dispenses, that makes her in- 
valuable. Nurse Myers probably knows more about boys than 
most women, not excluding the Old Woman who Lived in the Shoe, 
and she might write a much truer picture of school life than "Tom 
Brown at Rugby" if she were so inclined, but she prefers to keep 
her knowledge and smile. She smiles a great deal. 

MISS McCOLLUM. 

The Major-Domo of the flats so to speak ; she it is whom from 
the chaos of our laundry brings order and enables us to wear clean 
collars occasionally and thus give the fair sex a treat which they 
otherwise would have missed. Miss McCollum possesses great dis- 
cernment in her dealings with boys, as well as great patience and 
owing to this great virtue she is a most successful school matron. 

MR. GREGORY. 

A man who plays with figures, who can make them do weird 
contortions and then, presto ! our pocket money is one dollar instead 
of two. (We are paying for a looking-glass broken some time ago.) 
Entreaty moves him to the heart, but our pocket-money does not 
move up to two dollars again until the mirror is paid for. A Spar- 
tan in his finance, but with a large admixture of sentiment which 
he generously gives when financial assistance is not forthcoming. 
A genial philosopher who does not let sentiment interfere with 
business and who saves boys much trouble and parents much 
money. 

29 



30 



ST. AXDRKW'S COLLEGE RK\IEW 



THE BROOKES SISTERS. 

No, this is not a vaudeville act but the title for a study of two 
famous lady-financiers and golfers. All troubles in school eventual- 
ly reach either Miss Bessie or Miss Daisy, and they have solved 
more financial crises than Mr. Morgan. Their unfailing- tact, 
humour and helpfulness go a long- way toward making this life 
bright and exuberant. Besides their financial and diplomatic ac- 
complishments, they are in Miss Cecil Leitch's class as golfers and 
between them have lost six dozen golf-balls. When the time finally 
arrives for lady cabinet-ministers we should suggest either or both 
to fill Mr. Fielding's position. 

K. B. C. 




THE LITERARY SOCIETY EXECUTU'E 1921-2ii 



The School 



THE ROSS RECITAL. 

The evening- of the seventeenth of March marked the first 
•'Musical Night" sponsored by the Literary Society. On this even- 
ing Mr. Ross very kindly brought his choir to the school and they 
sang a programme ranging from popular selections to the sacred. 
All the numbers were enthusiastically^ received by the large number 
of visitors present, as well as by the boys themselves. The singing 
of this choir showed to advantage the diligent and careful training 
which Mr. Ross has given them. It is very difficult indeed to select 
a favourite from their delightful programme, for each number was 
splendidly rendered, but we must mention Dr. Macdonald's favour- 
ite, namely, "The Bells of St. Mary's." The Lower School was not 
forgotten b.y Mr. Ross either, for we had with us the far-famed 
Mr. Alexander, himself, who led the choir in singing about his re- 
nowned band. "Tony, the Wop" was also among those prominent 
in entertaining the younger boys. The choir rendered Sullivan's 
beautiful anthem, "Yea, Tho' I Walk," and displayed remarkable 
expression in this number. The plantation songs were all that even 
a "darky" could wish them to be and were heartily applauded. The 
climax of the evening, St. Patrick's Day, by the way, was the sing- 
ing of "Scots Wha Hae," which carried away even the followers of 
St. Patrick. We must also mention the singing of the School Songs 
l)y the boys assisted by the choir and the School Orchestra. 

Mr. Ross's pupils also took part in the programme and were a 
credit to their diligent teacher. It would be unfair to single out 
any one individual player as all played wath skill and accomplish- 
ment. The numbers given by the boys w-ere as follows: — 

Japanese Lanterns Newman 

Hungarian Dance McRae II. 

Idilio ^ Murchison I. 

Canzone Amoroso Breithaupt 

Spanish Dance .-. Stevenson 

Monastery Garden -•- Beer 

Hunting Song Robinson 

31 



32 ST. ANDREW'S COI.LEC.K RF-:\IK\V 

At the conclusion of the performance Mrs. Macdonald very kind- 
ly invited those taking- part in the programme to the Lil)rary where 
delicious I'efreshments were served. 

Altogether the programme v^^as capital and reflected great credit 
on Mr. Ross to whose untiring efforts the keen interest taken in 
music in the School and also the success of the evening is due. 

J. V. Russell. 



THE DRAMATIC CLUB PLAY. 

On January 19th last, the school elected a committee to sit in 
conjunction with Dr. Macdonald and Mr. Harris. At the first 
meeting on January 2 1th, oflicers were elected and the proposed 
play was considered. The Easter issue of the Review reported the 
progress to date, but at the time of going to press the tw^o perfomi- 
ances had not yet been given. After about twenty rehearsals a 
final dress performance was held on Wednesday evening, March 
29th. The lower school was admitted, and as there were no in- 
terruptions the scenery and costumes gave it the appearance of a 
finished production. 

About five hundred invitations w^ere sent to friends of the col- 
lege, including the parents of the boys, and on Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings, March 30th and olst, the Garden Scene from 
"Twelfth Night" was presented. But the fates were not with us. 
and the resulting w^eather was almost as stormy as possible. Slush 
over one's rubber tops, accompanied by sleet and rain, w^hich turned 
the powder off and stopped the street car service, w^ere the reward 
of our long and tedious efforts. Needless to add, the attendance 
was a meagre fraction of what we had anticipated. 

But the efforts of Mr. Harris, himself an actor of wide experi- 
ence, and the endeavours made by the entire cast, were not fruit- 
less. The Thursday performance ran along very smoothly, and no 
promptings w^ere required from the first to last curtain. Friday's 
presentation was given in a more experienced manner, and many 
improvements were made upon the "stage business" of Thursday. 
In the words of a spectator, "the performers did not act their parts : 
they lived them." Throughout the sparkling humour and the de- 
licious knavery of the entire scene, the audience was kept in laugh- 
ter. At nine fifty the final curtain was drawn; then followed calls 
for each of the players. At a request from Dr. Macdonald, Mr. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEC.E RK\ lEW 33 

Harris came forward and beckoned his cast about him. It was then 
that the players presented him with a sterling cigarette case as a 
token of their appreciation. 

A flashlight photograph was taken, and the dressing rooms soon 
became the scene of strange characters coming forth from stranger 
costumes and cleaning off grease paint. 

To facilitate the production, it was necessary to enlarge the 
stage in the assembly hall. This was done, and also footlights and 
curtains did their part towards making the performance a success. 
Four box-wood shrubs were placed at the back, and on the left a 
square bush. These set off twT) splendid white marble garden 
benches. For the finished appearance of the scenery we are in- 
debted to many, but perhaps to J. F. Ferguson especially, who ably 
acted as stage manager. 

It is hardly possible to single out any one members of the cast 
for special mention. The parts were each so different, and were 
each so well filled that praise must be given to the players as a 
whole rather than to any individual. The committee, however, 
takes this opportunity not only to commend the excellent work done 
by S. Ellis, but also to express to him their appreciation. As prop- 
erty manager he worked tirelessly, and with an efficiency truly 
commendable. 

That the cast has benefitted by the experience is beyond all 
doubt; that the Dramatic Club will become an important item on 
the school calendar is also beyond doubt. This first attempt has set 
a high standard of attainment for future presentations. To the 
years to come we look forward, confident that, as in other things, 
St. Andrew's College will be satisfied with nothing but the best. 

F. Roper Dayment. 



THE ASSAULT-AT-ARMS. 

The Assault-at-Arms this year was just as good as ever, but it 
was a pity some of the preliminaries of Monday and Tuesday were 
not kept for the finals. Carrick II, held the heavyweight boxing 
championship as he was unchallenged, while "Eddie" MacLennan 
won the heavyweight wrestling by virtue of defeating Sieling and 
Milton. 

Milton defeated Anderson in the one hundred and fifty-eight 
pound wrestling, and he defeated Bingham in the boxing, although 
"Freddie" almost "nosed" him out. Ault was also a double cham- 



34 ST. ANORKWS (■()1.ij-:(;e kkmkw 

mon, defeating- Stionach in both ))oxino- and wrestling-, winning- a 
great ovation lor his pliickiness and skill. 

"Blondy" Kirkland battered his way over Thompson and Rivera 
for the one hundred and thirty-five pound honours. And then came 
the l)est chiss of the lot — the one-twenty-five. In this class there 
wei-e such l)attlers as Noonan, McMurtry, and Beer, who each have 
won honours before, Beer two years ag-o won the Kirkhouse Cup 
for boxing and good sportsmanship when he defeated Ault, Meek 
and "Jimmy" Murchison. McMurtry defeated Beer by a technical 
knock-out in the second round, and then he tackled Meek, whom he 
also knocked out. Noonan, in the meantime, had defeated Duffus, 
and was itching to get after McMurtry — he did, and the battle 
lasted four rounds — When "the smoke cleared" it was found that 
"Eddie" Noonan, the New Jersey mosquitoe, was the champion of 
the hardest fought class in the school. 

The lower classes were as usual, well contested, the small fry 
showing some fine boxing. "Giant" and "Bob" Grant staged the 
premier performance in the 65-lb. class. "Giant" tried all his old 
tricks of ducking, jabs, and upper cuts, but young "Bob" landed 
enough on "Giant's" jaw to win the bout, and the formei- fifty-five 
pound champion was dethroned. 

"Giant," however, won the wrestling and went happily to led 
with two medals tiicked in his jeans. Every time he enters the 
ring-, this same little "Giant", we think of the time when "Kid" 
Stirret flourished as champion, when Kent and McArthur Ijattled 
for supremacy, when Earle and McGregor fought four rouads — and 
we often wonder if the school will always have as good boxers in 
the future as we have had in the past and present. We need not 
worry. As long as there are "Giants" and "Bob" Grant's in St. 
Andrew's Lower School we will always be in the front rank as 
exponents of wrestling, boxing, and above all, good sportmanship. 

The following is the summary of events: — 

WRESTLING. 

65-lbs. — Rol^iertson II., defeated Watson II. 

75-lbs.— Stollmeyer II., defeated Stollmeyer III. 

85-lbs. — McLennan II., defeated Brown I. 

95-lbs.— Parker defeated Watts. 
105-lbs. — Carrick III., outpointed Colebrook. 
145-lbs. — Ault defeated Stronach (4 rounds). 
158-lbs. — Milton defeated Anderson. 
Heavyweight — ^Milton lost to McLennan. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\1E\V 35 

FENCING. 
Robertson I., won from Dyment, 5 to 2. 

BOXING. 

65-lbs. — Giant II., beat Robertson II. 

75-lbs. — Stollmeyer III., defeated Stollmeyer II. 

85-lbs. — McLennan II., outpointed Gentles. 

95-lbs. — Reid II., won from Sproat 11. , but lost to Parker in 
the final. 
105-lbs. — Stewart I., l^eat Colebrook. 
115-lbs.— Morton II., lost to McLaren. 
135-lbs. — Kirkland outpointed Riviera. 
145-lbs. — Ault defeated Stronach. 
158-lbs.— Milton l:eat Rino-ham. 




■FIXDLEV I. WIXXIXG THE QUARTER-MILE.' 

SPORTS HAY. 

Despite adverse weather conditions the Annual Games Day w^as 
held on Friday, May nineteenth, and a fairly large number of 
friends and parents of the boys were present. The events were 
run off in good style, and some records would have undoubtedly 
been broken if the track had not been in such a wet condition. 

Morton L, won the School Championship with twenty-six points 
to his credit, while Howell, who wall be remembered as the winner 
of the Cross Country Run, won the Boarders Championship. Find- 
ley L, w^ho was looked upon as a contender for both these titles, 
broke the record in the high jump, but after g-aining- a big- lead in 
the hurdles tripped while going- over the second from the last one. 



36 ST. ANDRKW'S COLLEGE RE\ IKW 

The Junior Championship was won l)y Heyes, while Noriega I. 
won the House Championship. "Giant" created a great sensation 
by coming second in the sack race. 

Mrs. Cockshutt very kindly presented the prizes, and finished 
the "athletic" end of the afternoon l^y proclaiming a holiday — the 
most popular happening in the day. 

Then came the dance — afternoon tea — and then some more 
dancing — but the best of friends must part, and the boarders bade 
iheir guests a touching farewell at the gate — ^while the day boys 
whirled past in cars — but such is life I 

The list of events is as follows: — 

One Hundred Yards Dash. — Senior. — 1, Morton; 2, King; 3, 
Thompson. Time .11 1-5. 

Table Relay. — Cameron I. Table, Morton, Cameron H., Thomp- 
son, Curry. 

The Mile.— 1, Howell; 2, Berry; 3, Fairclough. Time— 5.05. 

Half Mile. — 1, Howell; 2, Fairclough; 3, Stephenson. 

The 440 Yards.— 1, Findley I. ; 2, Morton; 3, Howell. Time— .56. 

Throwing Cricket Ball. — (Senior). — 1, McTaggart; 2, Stronach ; 
3, Ferguson. Distance — 325 inches. 

Throwing Cricket Ball (Junior). — 1, Heyes; 2, Colebrook; 3. 
Noonan. 

Running High Jump (Junior). — 1, Grieg; 2, Fair; 3, Barclay. 
Heigh th — 4 feet 3V-2 inches. 

Standing Broad Jump (Senior). — 1, Morton; 2, Thompson; 3. 
Stephenson. Distance — 10 feet Vo inch. 

Standing Broad Jump (Junior). — 1, Heyes; 2, Nugent; 3, Nelles. 
Distance — 8 feet 2i-2 inches. 

Running Broad Jump (Senior). — 1, Howell; 2, McRae; 3, Mur- 
cheson H. Distance 17 feet 2 inches. 

Running Broad Jump (Junior). — 1, Grieg; 2, Nelles; 3, Noriega. 
Distance — 15 feet 6' o inches. 

Putting the Shot. — King, 35 feet 9 inches. 

100 Yards (under 17).— 1, Rivera; 2, Munn; 3, Robinson. Time 
— 12 seconds. 

50 Yards (Prep.).— 1, Strathy; 2, Gordon; 3, Edmunds. 

Hurdles (under 16).— 1, Ault; 2, Grant; 3, Fairclough. 

100 Yards (under 13).— 1, Dunlop H. ; 2, Young; 3, Taylor. 
Time — 14 seconds. 

Three-Legged Race. — 1, Cameron and Findlay HI. 

220 Yards (Senior). — 1, Morton; 2, Howell; 3, Murchison. 
Time— .26 1-5. 



ST. ANDREW S COl.LEC.E RE\IE\V 



37 



100 Yards (under 16).— 1, Grant; 2, Robinson; 3, Munn. Time 
— 11.2 seconds. 

Lower School Handicap. — 1, O'Connor; 2, Nelles. 

100 Yards (Junior). — 1, Heyes; 2, Heggie; 3, Noriega. Time 
— 12 4-5 seconds. 

Three-Legged Race (Prep.). — 1, Gordon and Temple. 

Hurdles (Senior). — 1, Thompson L; 2, Morton; 3, Findley I. 

220 (Junior).— 1, Heyes; 2, Greig; 3, McLean. 

Sack Race. — 1, Gallagher; 2, Robertson II. 

Obstacle Race. — 1, Dennis. 

Running High Jump (Senior). — 1, Findley I.; 2, Morton; 3, 
Cameron II. Distance — 5 feet 2 inches. 

Junior Hurdles. — 1, Heyes; 2, Greig; 3, Costigan. 

Old Boys' Race. — ^Gordon. 

220 (under 17).— 1, Rivera; 2, Grant; 3, Beer. 

Consolation (Junior). — 1, Colebrook; 2, Stollmeyer III. 

Consolation (Senior). — 1, Murchison 11. 



THE CADET CORPS. 



This year the college corps was organized early in the fall. 
Uniforms were issued and a few short drills held before Prize Day, 
November 30th. On that day His Excellency, Baron Byng, in- 
spected the corps, and expressed himself as very well pleased with 
its smart appearance. 

During the ceremony of unveiling our memorial tablet on that 
same day, the cadets added a significant touch of colour to the 




l]l:^^r 



:^S 



ST. .\M)ki:\\'s coi.LKc.i-: ri:\ii:\\ 



pi'ocei dings. The guai'd of honoui' for the tablet and the bugler 
for the last post, as well as the pipers foi- th(> lament, were all 
college cadets. 

In oi'dei' to facilitate the sprin;; term di'iils, thei'e was made a 
slight alte}"ation in the time table. A much lengthened noon hour, 
with the three periods of afternoon school ending at three-thirty, 
provided the means of di'illing at mid-day. There can be no ques- 
tion conco'ning the benefits of this plan. This, however, was only 
during the summer term, w^hen the corps had begun to drill each 
dav. 




OP'FICERS 1921-22. 



On Friday evening. May 12th, we paraded to the Armouries. 
The St. Andrew's Corps is affiliated with the 48th Highlanders, 
and we met them at the drill hall. After some ])reliminary cere- 
monies the entire regiment went on a route march around the 
down-town section of the city. In this our own band had its due 
share of providing the music. Retui'ning to the Armouries, Colonel 
Darling reviewed his companies, of which we formed a part. 
Afterwards the Colonel welcomed the cadets, and congratulated 
them on their smart appearance. 

On Sunday, May 21st, the College Corps paraded from the 



ST. ANDREW'S C()LLE(;p: REVIEW 



39 



school down to St. Paul's Ang-lican Church. It was the occasion 
of unveiling the memorial window, and the Governor-General was 
present to perform the ceremony. The window is exceedingly in- 
teresting. It has worked into its design 700 pieces of glass from 
the destroyed cathedrals and public buildings of France, Belgium 
and Italy. After the impressive service the cadets fell in on Blooi' 
Street and marched past in column of platoons to the skirl of 
"Highland Laddie." His Excellency received the salute from the 
church steps. 

Very fine weather was indeed welcome on Friday, May 26th, 
for the annual Government inspection. Colonel Barker, the inspect- 
ing officer, took the march past at three in the afternoon. Then 




: THK MARCH PAST; THP: Jl'XlOR CORPS LEADIN'G.' 

followed the inspection of the ranks. The advance in review order 
was well done. Advancing in extended order occupied about half 
an hour, and by five o'clock the inspection was drawn to a close. 
Colonel Barker then gave a very gratifying talk to the cadets. His 
words were to the effect that in the seven years he had inspected 
the corps he had always found it exceedingly tilm and smart. But 
this year he had been astonished by its improvement ovei' past 
years. The rifle drill was smarter, as also was the company drill. 
As regards the band it had grown in numbei's and had greatly im- 
proved in playing ability. In short, the corps would "take some 
competition to beat!" 

Last year the customary garrison parade was held for the first 
time since the war. It has been a splendid institution in past years, 
and many welcome its resumption. Again, this year, our corps 



40 



ST. ANDRKW'S COLLEC.H; RK\ IKW 



paraded down to the Armouries and joined the 48th. The route 
march had as its termination Massey Hall. Here a short but im- 
pressive service was held, including a most inspiring: address by Dr. 




LE.WIXG THE COLLEGE EOR ST. F.\UL S (, HURC H. 

Cody. The parade was again resumed, and ended by marching 
down University Avenue. Although he did not take the salute, 
Field Marshal Lord French was at the base in civilian clothes. The 
parade was dismissed upon arrival at the drill hall. 

As regards the corps, we are very proud of its splendid achieve- 
ments during this past year. The parades were well ordered, and 
the daily drills each a credit. We feel a measure of proudness at 
being twice reviewed by the Governor-General. To Sergeant-Majo}' 
Figg w^e are deeply indebted for his tireless efforts, and trust he 
has found a certain measure of gratification at the splendid results. 
Captain John Slatter, as instructor of the drums and bugles, de- 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEC.E RE\IE\V 41 

serves our hearty thanks, as does also Pipe Major Fraser, whose 
labour has produced the best pipe band in years. 

If it were not that almost the entire school was either in the 
Senior or Junior Corps, congratulations would be more in order. 
The Review, however, seizes the opportunity, by complimenting 
both officers and men on the success of the year. 

Officers, 1922. 

Captain J. A. Cameron 

1st platoon B. E. King 

2nd platoon A. G. Findlay 

3rd platoon . W. E. Earle 

4th platoon Joel Cameron 

Bandmaster F. R. Daymen! 

F. Roper Dayment. 



SIR ROBERT FALCONER'S SERMON. 

On the evening of May 28th, the school had the pleasure of list- 
ening to a sermon by Sir Robert Falconer. 

He chose as his subject "The Greatest Man That Ever Lived," 
and pointed out that each nation of the world had what it consid- 
ered the greatest man, also that many might consider the inventive 
genius or the discoverer of electricity to be that man. In the opin- 
ion of Jesus, however, John the Baptist was the greatest man that 
ever lived. Here was a man who made mistakes and at times did 
not even follow Jesus, and yet he was great because of his firmness. 

The truly great man in this world is the one who does not yield 
too much to pressure, but stands firmly rooted in his convictions ; 
he is not necessarily the one who is eager to please everybody. In 
time of stress the type of man wanted is one who can stand on his 
own feet and tell the truth without trying to smooth it over or to 
make things look different than they really are. 

The recent rectorial address given at St. Andrew's, Scotland, 
by Sir James Barrie, was considered one of the greatest of its 
kind. It was based on the subject. Courage, and it "lovely virtue;" 
not so much physical courage, but the courage to do the square 
thing wherever you are. 

In closing, Sir Robert showed that John the Baptist was the 
greatest man that ever lived because of his great sincerity and 
courage and the manner in which he preached God's truth. 



42 



ST. ANDKKW'S COI.I.KC.H RKXIKW 



THE SC HOOL ORCHESTRA. 

This year the school orchestra had a very busy and also most 
successful season. They were most elHcient, and even when called 
to play at a moment's notice, showed to great advantage. 

They were most fortunate in having the capable Mr. Ross direct 
iheir practices. Under his diligent training they soon developed a 
real professional style. Numbering nine players — three first vio- 
lins, two second violins, two saxaphones, traps and piano — they 
could be depended upon on all occasions. 




THE SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 



Their first appearance before the school was on the day before 
the liidley game when their playing of the school songs helped the 
boys to express what they expected of the football team. They next 
appeared to advantage on Prize Day, when Lord Byng visited us. 
They finally established themselves by their fine playing at the 
meetings of the Literary Society, taking part in every programme. 
They also gave several selections on the night of the Cadet Corps 
dance, which were greatly enjoyed by those present. The oi'ches- 
tra is now recognized as an important factor in the school life, and 
it is to be hoped that next year's orchestra will be as successful as 
the one of 1922. 



st. andrew's college re\ie\v 43 

Personnel of the School Orchestra. 

Hunter, "Hal." — Our star saxaphone player. Assisted by 
Rowell he kept up a great opposition to the rest of the orchestra. 
Good on solo parts especially "The Sheik." Leaves a place that will 
be hard to fill. (We suspect that Romanelli had something- to do 
with Hal's departure.) 

Scott, "Jimmie." — Another "old colour." Fond of classical 
music, but always plays jazz, especially "Stealing." We have not 
found out yet why this is his favourite, but time will tell. 

Hillary, "Art." — A veteran at violin playing. Always on hand 
for the practices, and works hard. Some day is going to compose a 
song entitled "Bee Tress." 

Howell, "Helnie." — Does exceptionally well the second violin 
parts. Gi'eat help, especially in pronouncing the names of the 
classical music. 

Cameron, "Joe." — Among other accomplishments plays the vio- 
lin. "Heinie" and he kept right after the first violinist. 

Rowell, "Brad."— Our new saxaphone artist. Hal and he got 
away with some smooth notes. Promises to develop. 

Bingham, "Freddie." — Trap artist. He also plays the bass 
drum in the Cadet Corps. A born musician ! ! ! 

Mr. Laidlaw. — The old reliable. Was on hand at all times to 
help and encourage us. We owe a great deal of our success to his 
splendid playing. 

Russell, "Hink." — The piano artist with the bow tie, com- 
monly called "The Organist." Believes in saying it with music. 
Handles the music with the utmost care. 



THE UPPER SIXTH. 

"Lives of great men oft rem bid ms 

We can make our lives sublime; 

And, departing, leave behind vs 

Footsteps on the sands of Time." 

Longfellow. 
Like all Upper Sixes we consider ourselves to have among our 
number some of the world's coming men. All the types of the lead- 
ers of men are represented in this cosmopolitan aggregation. Can- 
ada's future Premiers, preachers, postmen and police, will be 
chosen from these departing Andreans. Let us now proceed to in- 
troduce these worthy hopefuls: 



44 



ST. A\I)[<K\\'S (•()LI,K(;K Rf-:\IK\V 




st. andrew's collec.e re\ie\v 45 

Bullock, "Larry."... 

"Yon fellow has a lean and hungry look." 

Larry is a gentleman of leisure, and like a true gentleman he is 
always a little slack in keeping his appointments, especially those 
with the masters. He is one of the Boys of the Old Brigade, having 
attended S. A. C. since somewhere in the B.C.'s. 

He has three periods of school a week, and is usually here for 
one of them, if there is nothing of any importance happening. 
However, his scrawny figure is a well-known one about the College 
campus. He and Hillary, another young buck, are taking an ex- 
tended tour of Europe this summer ; and we expect in future to see 
the map of that unfortunate continent always done in red. 

Carrick, L, "Jess.' 
"I am Sir Oracle, and when I ope my li])s, let no dog bark." 

Jess honours Port Arthur by calling it his birthplace. 

He calls no man his master, and many a man his friend. The 
big boy is successful at rugby, hockey, golf, loud talking, leave yarns 
and "bawling the boys out." He is a drummer, a scholar, a pre- 
fect, a heart smasher, a head smasher, and has Bolshevik instincts. 

He has only three ambitions : Firstly, to stage a fight between 
his brother Don and Dempsey ; secondly, to have a million dollars 
to bet on Don ; and, thirdly, to knock any one cold who does not 
think Don is a "good guy." 

After breaking all the hearts in Toronto, he has decided to take 
an extended tour through Central Europe, where he hopes to find 
new fields of conquest. His motto is : Veni, Vidi, Vici. 

Dayment, "Ropo." 

"He thinks too much: such men are dangerous." 

Ropo is one of the star students who ornament the Upper Sixth. 
He is in the good books of all the masters, and, although a dreamer, 
very rarely asleep in class. 

Ropo used to be the best piper in the band ; but he has become 
so expert that he now commands the whole band, bossing it around 
generally, and heading the Cadet Corps when it is on parade. 

He is always on hand when the Review staff" wants some dirty 
work done, and his editorials have graced the front page of many 
an issue. 

Having taken honours at junior matriculation last year, he is 
probably going to add a few more prizes to his handsome collection 
after this coming June. 



4tj ST. ANDKKWS ('(MA.ECE RH\"IK\V 

Earle, "Hap." 

"Thou art a fellow of a tiood respect." 

When Hap used to live in St. John, N.B., while playing by the 
woodhouse door, he saw a sandwich man go by carrying a sign with 
that age-old saying of Jonah's, "Go West young man, go West," and 
Hap, being a man of action and ambition, came to S. A. C. These 
aforesaid qualities made him a prefect, captain of a championshi]/ 
rugby team, a lieutenant in the Cadet Corps, and, in general, a man 
of no small repute. 

He is heading for S. P. S., and intends to become a mechanical 
engineei'. 



Fisher, I., "Dickie." 

"A common slave— you knoic him irell htj sight:' 

It was Dick that inspired Mr. Magee to make that now famous 
saying, "Boys will be children." 

He has, no doubt, a great future before him, as Canada's fore- 
most interior decoi'ator — if we are to judge by his drawings on the 
blackboard. 

Although, as Napoleon says, "The pun is the lowest fomi of 
wit," Dickie has, by perseverance and deep study, made it a high 
art. 

He is a well-known figure on the social gridiron, particularly in 
North Rosedale. 

Dick is also a budding architect; but. since French is necessary 
for the architecture course, we have our doubts whether he will 
make the grade. 



Fisher, H., "Ed." 

"As idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean." 

Hails from Huntsville, and, like all people from the far North, 
has a decided weakness for Eskimo pies. 

In winter, when he is home, he di'ives the mail dog-team between 
Huntsville and a town one stop this side of Alaska. 

This youth has invented a new kind of French pronounciation 
that is entirely original, and, although no one can understand him 
as yet, Fisher's Flowery French may yet oust Esperanto as the 
world's universal language. 



ST. A\i:)RFAVS COI.LEC'.E RKVIKW 47 

FINDLAY, I., "AL." 

"Let me play the fool, irith wirfh and laughter, let old wrinkles 
come." 

This lackadaisical fellow graces the Upper Sixth with his pres- 
ence only when some language is on the programme. It is doubt- 
less in order to make use of what Mr. Magee has had so much trou- 
ble in teaching him, that he is going abroad this summer. But Al 
likes originality. He is going to cross the pond in a cattle boat. We 
don't want to discourage him, but the less said about it now, the 
better. 

During the winter term Al discharged with great dis- 
tinction the office of first vice-president of the Literary Society. 
Just now he is one of the chief bosses in the Cadet Corps. He has 
distinguished himself as half back on the I'ugby team and manager 
of the hockey team. Al, our prefect, athlete and literary genius, 
has been at S. A. C. for eight years. It will be a different place 
without him. 

FiNDLAY, II., "GEORDIE." 

"Give everij man thij ear, bid few thy voice." 

The man that Mr. Flemming always relies upon to answer an\- 
hard questions in mathematics. 

He is a silent but very efficient partner in the Upper Sixth. 

Any of the Findlay family are welcome at St. Andrew's, as all 
the samples we have received in late years are of the first class. 

We can find no better biography than the following incident 
which occuri'ed the other day between Geordie and the bandmaster, 
when Geordie remarked to Mr. Slatter, "You may be the band- 
master, but I am the band." 

Hillary. "Art." 

"This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit." 

Art was once described as being "a hail fellow all wet," and al- 
though he is shy and retiring among- his fellow students, he always 
does the hail fellow act when his classes are in session. 

He is the bane of his masters' lives, whom he seems to regard 
as his friendly enemies. 

He pays enough attention, however, to head the Upper VI., and 
.speaks Latin like a drain-digger. He also fiddles away his time in 
the orchestra. 

Toronto financial circles are eagerly awaiting his debut as a 
banker. 



48 st. andrkws cullkc.e rk\1e\v 

Howell, "Heinie." 

"He rejoices as a strong man to run a race." 

The foreign element in the Upper Sixth. Although born in the 
States, he has acquired from living on the Continent the languages, 
manners and even the appearance of an European, 

He speaks broken English, but can generally be understood by 
the use of signs and a translating dictionary. 

He has a fine record both in school work and sports, having won 
the cross-country run and the senioi- boarders' championship. He 
has also been made a prefect, and although he calls the roll in 
French and says grace in German, he discha]'ges his duties like a 
true son of the Fatherland. 

McRae. L, "Shirley." 

"Misslike me not for mij complexion." 

He honours Halifax by calling it his home. He has a very 
peculiar appearance, his complexion being somewhat between that 
of a mulatto and a Zulu. The darkness of his mottled skin shows 
off that smile you can see a mile, which he uses under all circum- 
stances ! 

He is just over five feet in height, and his head is crowned with 
a patch of colourless hair of a kind that is inclined to early bald- 
ness. 

A Scotchman with an Irish sense of humour describes Shirley 
McRae, the bo\ with the one hundred per cent, profile. 

His ambition is to be a commercial mag'nate. 

McRae, H., "Lou." 

"This is a slight, unmeritable man, 
Meet to he sent on errand." 

Now a native of Halifax, although he has seen far better cities. 

He is a brother of Shirley's, and has the dazzling McRae smile. 
as well as some other qualities that will some day make him a rival 
to Douglas Fairbanks. 

The loss of half of his two front teeth rather impaired his laugh- 
ing abilities for a week or two this term; but as he had a dental 
architect build them in again, he is "chewing the rag" as much as 
ever. 

He is second to none at "bawling the boys out," and has a spe- 
cial grudge against Sgt. -Major Figg. 

Lou is heading for Dalhousie, and hopes to go into some busi- 
ness in the near future. 



ST. ANDREW'S C0LLP:(;P: review 49 

Macdonald, L, "Jack." 

"H/.s words 'W&re simple enoughy 

S. A. C.'s most famous and effective platoon-sergeant ; a man in 
his platoon can't wink an eyelash without bringing down upon him 
whispered and menacing warnings of "nix, fellows, here comes 
Uncle." 

In his spare time he heads the Upper Sixth. 

Jack has had many tempting offers to edit the "The Woman 
About Town" column of the society page of Toronto's leading news- 
papers. 

Although he is not a participant in the college athletic activities, 
he has always given his whole-hearted moral support to every school 
game. He is also one of the old guard as far as long attendance is 
concerned. 



GOLF. 

After a lapse of four years, the royal and ancient game of golf 
has again been resumed at St. Andrews. In 1918 there were only 
three holes on the grounds. This year four more have been added 
and the number of golfers has been at least tripled. The holes 
average from one hundred to one hundred and seventy-five yards, 
and, as there are some good natural hazards, the course is quite in- 
teresting from a golfer's standpoint. 

Dr. Macdonald, realizing that golf is a coming game, has lent it 
his whole-hearted support, and the St. Andrew's course, like its 
elder brothei" in Scotland, may become the home of future cham- 
pions. It is to be hoped that in the near future golf will become a 
"liittle Big Four" game, as there is no cleaner or more gentlemanly 
game. 

McLelland. 




Cricket this year has been entered into more heartily than ever 
before. We have a first, second, third and lower school eleven, be- 
sides such aggregations as Mr. Laidlaw's Own, Mr. Church's Pride, 
and Col. Taylor's Army — the last named being the conscripts who 
enter into the game with great joy and pride. 

The first team has shown the same spirit as all our teams have 
this year and have, at the date of writing, won three matches, tied 
one and lost one, and show indications of rounding out into one 
of the best elevens we've had in years. 

The seconds, under "Ole' Bill" Easton, are bringing pride to the 
heart of that enthusiastic cricketer, Mr. Goodman, by winning their 
games, a thing our second eleven hasn't done for one or two years 
— l)ut then "Ole' Bill" is some captain. 

The thirds with such hitters as "Smooth Ole' Rufe" Curry, 
"Kamloops" Milton and "Ike" Cochrane, couldn't fail in winning — 
they just rush a team right off their feet — then comes "Col. Tay- 
lor's Army." They have a fine history, being conscripted in the 
middle of the term, they promptly determined "to do the Colonel 
proud" — so they knocked Mr. Church's Pride all over the field, and 
then cleaned up on Mr. Laidlaw's Own — at present they stand alone 
— monarchs of all they survey. 

The Lower School, as usual, has a crack team, and all are try- 
ing hard to make it. Even in the Upper School it is hard to find 
a bowler like Stollmeyer III. or Noriega I. — or a finer back-stop 
than "Giant", who is as good at cricket as he is at boxing and 
wi'estling. 

50 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 51 

The Masteis also have taken an interest in cricket— even Mr. 
Fleming- could be seen out "sling-ing- the pill" — and Mr. Magee 
chasing boundaries — it is a fine thing for the boys to have such a 
fine example set for them. 

Well, 'matric." draws near- — and above the pandemonium of the 
rustling pages of fear-stricken l)oys we wish the first team good 
luck in their games in the Little Big Four. 

ST. ANDREW'S VS. YORKSHIRES. 

St. Andrew's first game this season was at home against the 
I'edoubtable Yorkshire team, Champions of Canada. At first, things 
looked rather badly, our star hitters, Cameron and King, getting 
out for three between them, but then Lyon knocked out a neat 
eighteen, and Palmer got seventeen. Home got out for a duck, and 
our next wickets fell fast — too fast for comfort, however, D'Arcy 
Palmer stepped up third from the last and made twenty-six and 
Cameron H. sixteen, so we closed shop with one hundred and six- 
teen runs to our credit. 

Then Yorkshires, after a hard day in the field came yelling 
for our scalps— and if they all had been like Kerslake they would 
have got them, but fortunately they weren't, and after he made 
fifty-two, the rest dropped like grass before a sickle. It was a good 
omen — we had won our first game. 

St. Andrew's. 

King c. Goodaire, b. Hall 1 

Cameron I. run out 2 

Lyon, run out 18 

Palmer I. b. Murray 17 

Home, b. Murray 

Findlay III. c. Goodaire; b. Jones 11 

McCannell. b. Murray 

Reid b. Denton 14 

Palmer II. b. Murray 26 

Cameron II. not out 16 

Earle, b. Jones ., 1 

Byes 3 

. Total 116 



52 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEC.E REXIEW 



Yorkshires. 

Kerslake c. King; b. Findlay 52 

Joy b. Lyon 2 

Fielding- c. Palmer 11. ; b. Lyon 

Hall G., run out 3 

Priestley b. Lyon 7 

Denton run out 11 

Jeffery b. Lyon _ 1 

Marsden l.b.w. ; b. Lyon 

Murray b. Palmer IL 

Jones not out , 5 

(j oodaire run out 12 

Byes 5 

Total 98 




ST. ANDREW'S VS. DOVERCOURT. 

In our second game we ran away with Dovercourt to the tune 
of one hundred and fifty-one for six to seventy-two. For the first 
lime in the season Reid hit his stride and knocked up a neat forty- 
one. Palmer I. and Cameron L followed close on his footsteps 
making thirty-six and thirty-four, respectively, and after King 
had made 13 we declared. 

Dovercourt then went to bat, but the bowling of the Findlay- 
Lyon Co., was too much for them, and they were all out for seventy- 
two. Badger being high scorer with twenty-four. 

Findlay did exceptionally well in bowling, getting six wickets, 
and Lvon nailed four. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEC.K Ki:\IK\V 53 

The team showed it was shaping up well in the field, and their 
batting left nothing to be desired, 

St. Andrew's. 

Palmer II. b. Colborne 3 

Reid hit wickets; b. Goodman 41 

Earle c. Gannet ; b. Butterfield 6 

Lyon c. Simmons; b. Butterfield 4 

McCannell c. Parker; b. Colborne 5 

Cameron I. not out 34 

Palmer I. c. Bodger ; b. Colborne 5 

King not out 13 

Findlay III., Home, Cameron, did not bat 

Byes 9 

Total 151 for 6 




THE MAN BEHIND THE FIRST ELEVEN. 



54 ST. ANDKKWS COl.l.KCH RH\"IK\V 

DOVERCOURT. 

Ledger b. Findlay 

Colborne b. Lyon 9 

Colborne, J. h. Findlay 17 

Simmonds c. Reid ; b. Findlay 5 

Garnett b. Lyon : 8 

Parkes c. and b. Lyon , 2 

Bodg-er not out 24 

Butterfield b. Findlay 

Goodman c. Palmer IL ; b. Findlay 3 

Flott run out 

Wunn c. and b. Findlay 4 



Total • 72 



ST. ANDREW'S VS. GRACE CHURCH. 

On Victoria Day our team took the field and experienced their 
first defeat of the season. The culprits who showed us up were 
none other than the Grace Church eleven, who exhibited some of 
the nicest bowling we have seen on our wicket for some time. 

We went to bat first — and after Lyon made twenty-four; King 
thirteen; some others, ones, twos and ducks; we left it and ate 
dinner. It didn't do us a bit of good for Grace Church walked out 
knocked up ninety-six, and then invited us to another innings. 

Nothing daunted, our cricketers took the field to pull down a 
twenty-seven run" lead and made ninety-six runs — Jack McCannell 
and his little bat being responsible for twenty-three of them — then 
we felt confident. 

Smiling very nicely Grace Church went to bat — swatted Lyon. 
Findlay and King all over the map, made seventy-one for six. and 
then drew stumps and went home to tea. 

Bruce King is still wondering how they did it. 

St. Andrew's — First Inning. 

Cameron I. run out 1 

Reid b. Muckleston 

Lyon c. Campbell; b. Groves 25 

Palmer I. c. Sub. ; b. Sippi 3 

Cameron II. b. Muckleston 2 



ST. AXDKKWS COI.I.KCK Ri:\li:\\ 



55 



King run out 

Fiiidlay III. I). Muckleston 
Palmer II. b. Muckleston 

Earle b. Groves 

Home b. Muckleston 

McCannell not out 

Bves 



13 


3 
2 


18 



Total 



67 




"THE DETENTION SQUAD AT WORK.' 



Grace Church — First Inning. 



Beardall b. Lyon 4 

Hetherington c. Palmer 11. ; b. Findlay III 1 

Bland run out 16 

C. Muckleston c. Earle; b. King 22 

Campbell c. Earle; b. Findlay III 1 

Sippi c. Cameron I. ; b. Home 27 

Melville b. Reid 

G. Muckleston c. Palmer I.; b. King 12 

Groves run out 9 

Blauvelt b. Lyon 1 

Tucker not out - 

Extras 3 

Total 96 



56 st. axdkkws collkck rkxikw 

St. Andrew's — Second Inning. 

Cameron I. c. and b. Muckleston 5 

Palmer 1. c. and b. Sippi 9 

Reid c. Melville; b. Muckleston 2 

Lyon c. Heardall ; b. Muckleston 11 

King- b. Muckleston . 

McCannell c. Beaidall : b. Groves 23 

Earle c. Beardall ; b. Groves 9 

Cameron II. c. and b. Muckleston 9 

Home b. Muckleston 5 

P'indlay III. c. Hetherington ; b. Groves ..., 8 

Palmer 11. not out 3 

Extras 10 



Total 94 

Grace Church — Second Inning. ... 

Campbell b. Lyon 11 

Sippi b. Lyon 9 

Beardall l.b.w. Lyon 11 

J. Muckleston b. Palmer II 26 

Bland c. Cameron I. ; b. King 4 

Hetherington b. King 

Groves not out 4 

C. Muckleston not out 3 

Melville, Blauvelt,- Tucker, did not bat 

Extras 1 



Total 69 



S. A. C. vs. U. S. C. C. 

The game with the United Service Cricket Club on Saturday, 
May 20th, was played under a cloudy sky and a continual light rain. 
The crease rapidly became cut up. 

St. Andrew's were in first and the luck seemed as bad as the 
weather. Jimmie Palmer went in and our hopes rose, but he missed 
his first boundary by one inch and went out for a duck. However, 
Captain Bruce King and Joe Cameron got their heads together and 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 57 

tired out two bowlers with very good results. Cameron had knocked 
one for four runs when Mellott picked it off near the boundary, 
leaving- Joe with twenty-seven runs. King carried his bat with 
forty-six to his credit. The luck ran in the Palmer family, and 
Darce tied his brother's score. For U. S. C. C. Buckle took seven 
wickets. St. Andrew's made a total of 161 runs. 




SCHOOL CHAMPIONS— Sitting— /?/( to r/g/!/. Howell (cross country and boarders' championship) ■ 
Robertson I, (tencing). Standing. McLennan I cwrestling); Carrick II (boxing); Morton I (track 

and field athletics). 



58 ST. ANDRIIW'S COl.I.KCK kFAIKW 

The 1-ain stopped for a while when U. S. C. C. went in, but it 
came on again later. 

Once more the luck seemed against us when Mellott and Ottley 
steadily knocked out a score for U. S. C. C, but King again came to 
the rescue and caught Mellott on the way for a six. The wickets 
went down more quickly then, Captain Buckle getting out for a duck. 
Jimmie Palmer was heard to say that he "might as well be eating 
for all the work," etc., but when a ball came flying off in the slips 
he picked it up nicely and V. S. C. C. was out for seventy runs. 

St. Andrew's. 

Cameron 1., b. Buckle 9 

Reid c. Lingard, b. Buckle 11 

Findlay III., b. Buckle . 8 

Lyon hit wickets 12 

Palmer I., b. Buckle '. 

Home b. Buckle 8 

King, not out 46 

Cameron II., c. Mellott, b. Ottley 27 

Palmer 11., b. Lingard 

Earle stumped, b. Buckle 15 

Birkett b. Buckle 1 

Extras 24 



161 



United Services. 



Ottley c. Lyon, b. Findlay III 22 

Mellot c. King, b. Findlay HI 11 

Challener b. Findlay III 1 

Lingard b. Lyon 8 

Prestons c. Cameron II., b. Findlay III. 9 

Walton c. Cameron IL, b. Lyon 1 

Buckle b. Lyon 

Eccles run out 

Ruthven c. Palmer I., b. Findlay III 10 

Fallows b. Lyon 

Tucker, not out 4 

Extras 4 

70 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 59 

ST. ANDREW'S vs. OLD BOYS. 

On SaUirday, May 27th, the first team played the annual game 
with the Old Boys. The weather was all that could be expected. 
Nine Old Boys turned up amongst whom were four ex-captains. 

The Old Boys went in, and at first the eleven treated the game 
as a social event. But when McPherson and Crawford began to 
knock out too many runs the team settled down to work and the 
final score stood at 46. 

The school went in and knocked out 94 regardless of the fact 
that Joe Taylor was up to his old-style and took six wickets for 17 
runs. Jack Camei'on lead with 24 runs. 

Old Boys. 

McPherson b. Lyon 11 

Coatsworth c. Cameron I., b. Lyon 

Crawford c. and b. Findlay III 10 

Cassels, run out 

Taylor, run out 

Wood b. Findlay III 2 

Hewitt b. King 8 

Ramsey b. King 

Ault b. Reid. 8 

Sloan, not out 4 

Birkett b. Earle 

Byes 3 



Total 46 

St. Andrev^'s. 

Cameron I. b. McPherson 24 

McCannell b. Taylor 14 

Lyon b. Taylor 11 

Cameron 11. c. Coatsw^orth, b. Taylor 2 

Reid c. Hewitt, b. McPherson 10 

King, not out 7 

Rivera c. Ramsey, b. Taylor 6 

Earle c. Da vies, b. Taylor 

Palmer II. b. Taylor 1 

Findlay III., not out 14 



60 ST. ANDREW'S C0I,LEC;E REVIEW 

Home, did not bat 

Byes 4 

Wides 1 

Total : 94 



S. A. C. vs. ROSEDALE. 

The first team met Rosedale Cricket Club on May 18th, and the 
weather threatened fi'om the start. Desultory showers soon made 
the pitch impossible. Rosedale won the toss and went in first. 
They hit up many catches, seven of which were fatal. Wakefield 
and Auid knocked out thirteen each, and then fell. The others 
brouftht the score up to fifty-two. St. Andrew's went in to bat, but 
on account of the rain stumps were drawn with three out for five 
runs. 




PREFECTS 192.-22 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLECzE REMEW 



01 



S. A. C. vs. T. C. S. 

Our First Eleven opened its season in the Little Big Four by 
defeating Trinity on our own grounds. Trinity won the toss and 
went to bat, but shortly after dinner they were all out for 83. Then 
Lyon and McCannell, St. Andrew's mighty cricketers, went to bat. 

Lyon got out for 13, playing the ball on his wicket, but McCan- 
nell played a beautiful innings, making 84, one more than the whole 
T. C. S. team, and the highest score made by a St. Andrew's player 
in some years. 

Cameron IL batted out a nice forty, while Bruce Findlay 
knocked out thirty-nine runs. 

The fielding of both teams was very good, but the Trinity bowl- 
ers were not up to the high standard of previous years. 



St. Andrew's. 

J. McCannell c. Johnson IL, b. Cruickshank 84 

F. Lyon b. Moore 13 

J. Palmer L, b. Wolfenden 16 

B. Findlay IIL, b. Spragge 39 

J. Cameron I., b. Wolfenden 17 

B. King b. Wolfenden 5 

G. Reid b. Cruickshank 9 

J. Cameron IL, not out 40 

D. Palmer IL, not out 29 

W. Earle, did not bat 

K. Home, did not bat 

Extras 2 

Total 254 

Trinity. 

Moore c, Cameron IL, b. King 24 

Lazier b. King 2 

Mulholland b. Lyon 17 

Cameron b. King 2 

Lennard l.b.w. b. King 

Johnston I. c. Earle, b. Lyon 11 

Wolfenden c. Cameron L, b. King , 5 

Doupe b. King 4 

Cruickshank c. Reid, b. King 4 



62 ST. ANDRKW'S COLLEGE REXIEW 

Spragge, not out ■ 

Johnston II., b. King 

Extras 

Total : : 

Bowling. 
S. A. C. 

Lyon 2 for 

King - 8 for 

T. C. S. 

Moore 1 for 

Lazier for 

Cruickshank 2 for 

Wolfenden 3 for 



1 
11 



83 



16 

48 



37 
43 
50 
42 




E\EX THE HEAD PREFECT ENJOYS A LITTLE 
^LA.^■UAL LABOUR AT TIMES." 



ST. ANDKKWS COl.LKC.K RH\1K\\ 63 

S. A. C. vs. U. C. C. 

Our second game was against our old rivals on the Hill, As 
they had been defeated by Ridley the previous Saturday thej^ wei'e 
not in the running for championship honours. 

We won the toss and took the field. At first the Blue and White 
looked dangerous, but when "Dav." Wright got out for eighteen, 
and Gunn got caught for 27, things went smoothly and their team 
went out for 87 — four more than T. C. S. had made. 

We went to bat, and after they had taken two wickets for 12 we 
piled up a useful 110 and won the first innings. In the second 
innings our fieldei's and bowlers staged a comeback, and got the 
whole U. C. C. team out for twenty-three runs. Then, going to 
bat, Findlay soon knocked out the winning run, so the match was 
ours by ten wickets. 

St. Andrew's. 

McCannell b. Seagram , 6 

Lyon c. Seagram, b. Grier 29 

Palmer 1., b. Matthews 

B. Findlay III., run out 10 

Cameron I., c, Armstrong, b. Grier 8 

King b. Seagram 20 

Reid b. Seagram 8 

Cameron II., b. Mason 

Palmer II., not out 19 

Earle b. Matthews 6 

Home b. Matthews 

Extras 3 

Total 110 

Upper Canada. 

Wright b. King 18 

Matthews b. King 

Logie b. Lyon ■. 5 

Gunn c. and b. King 27 

Seagram b. King 

Smith c. Palmer I., b. Findlay 11 

Grier c. Reid, b. Findlay 



64 



ST. ANDKKWS COI.I.KCH RK\IF-:\V 



Armstrong c. Earle, b. P^indlay 
Hinton c. Palmer 11. , b. Findlay 

Rogers c. and b. Lyon 

Mason, not out 

Extras 

Total 





17 
9 




Upper Canada. 

(Second Innings.) 

Wright, run out . 

Seagram c. Cameron II., b. Lyon 

Logie c. McCannell, b. King 5 

Gunn l.b.w, b. Lyon 1 

Rogers c. Earle, b. Lyon 3 

Smith c. Earle, b. King 

Matthews b. King 4 

Grier b. Lyon 4 

Armstrong b. King o 

Mason c. Reid, b. King 

Hinton, not out 

Extras : 1 

Total : 28 



St. Andrew's. 

(Second Innings.) 

Findlay III., not out 

Remainder did not bat 

Total ." 

R. H. Anderson. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEC.E REVIEW 



65 




BRUCE KING, CAPTAIN FIRST CRICKET TEAM, 1922. 



66 ST. ANDRKWS COI.LKCK RK\"IE\V 

PERSONNEL OF FIRST CRICKET TEAM. 

Lyon, "Freddie." — Fourth year on the team and one of the old 
standbys of cricket at S. A. C. Our steadiest bowler, and a beauti- 
ful bat. Probably the best all-around cricketer on the team. 

Cameron I., "Jack." — Third season with the team. Jack stops 
the ball behind the wickets just as he does the puck in front of the 
nets. Makes use of his experience and position as wicket-keeper to 
steady the team on many occasions. An excellent bat. 

FiNDLAY III. "Bruce." — Third year on the team. He fields his 
position in the slips well, and won his place as one of the premier 
bowlers. 

McCannell, "Jack." — Third year on the team. A pretty bat 
who improved during the season, and should make good scores in 
the school games. A little weak in fielding. 

Earle, "Hap." — Third year on the team. A good steady all- 
around player, who improved in batting and fielding. When "Hap" 
connects, the ball travels. 

Palmer I., "Jimmie." — Second year on the team. An excel- 
lent forcing bat, but becomes impatient. He is a most lackadasi- 
cal person during pi-actices, but usually settles down in a match 
and rarely hits the ball for less than four. 

Cameron H.,- "Joe." — Second year on the team. Very effective 
if he gets his eye in. He fields the difficult position of square leg. 

Home, "Ken." — Second year on the team. He is a good fielder 
at cover point, and a fair bowler, but not up to his last year's stand- 
ard in batting yet. 

Reid, "Jerry." — A new colour. Has improved wonderfully as 
a bat and is well up in the order. Jerry is our demon fielder at 
point, who snaps them up from any angle. 

Palmer H., "Darcie." — A new colour, and an excellent fielder, 
who plays a good game and will be a valuable man next year. 

BiRKETT, "Ted." — Also a new- colour, and a very good bat of the 
heavy hitting type, but a bit lax in fielding. Should be useful next 
year. 

King, "Bruce." — Captain. Third year on the team. A very 
steady bat and a good fielder, but a little weak on pop flies. Shows 
good judgment in handling the bowlers. 



ST. AXDRKW'S COl.LKCK KFAIKW 



67 




68 



ST. AM)r<E\VS roi.LECE RE\IH\V 



THE SECOND ELEVEN. 

We regret that we can only report one game played by the Sec- 
onds. Several other games are scheduled, but they will take place 
too late in the term to be recorded in this issue. 

On Wednesday, May 17th, the team journeyed to Oakville to 
play its annual match with Appleby School. St. Andrew's batted 
first and six wickets fell with remarkable rapidity. River.a and 
Lewis then made a fine stand, the former knocking up 52 by clever 




THE SECOND CRICKET TEAM. 



and careful batting. Lewis did some good slugging for his 27. In 
the field Ault's work was the feature, while Marshall's and Rivera's 
bowling, considering the heavy wicket, was remarkably good. For 
Appleby, Manbert bowled well, while Osier was top scorer with 14 
runs to his credit. 



St. Andrew's Second Team. 

Clift b. Thomas : 

McCannell c. and b. Manbert , 

Carrick II., b. Manbert 4 

McTaggart, b. Manbert 8 



ST. ANDREW'S COIJ.KCE REX'IEW 09 

Easton c. and b. Manbert 

Rivera, run out ., : 52 

Lumbers I., c. and b. Manbert , :. 8 

Marshall, c. Walker, b. Manbert ......: 

Lewis, l.b.w. Manbert 27 

Ault b. Manbert 1 

McLennan L, not out '. 1 

Extras : 6 



Appleby School. 



107 



Thomas b. Rivera 1 

Osier c. and b. Marshall 14 

Little I., run out - 9 

Manbert b. Rivera 1 

Carruthei's b. Marshall 

Rogers c. and b. Marshall 3 

Langmuir c. Ault, b. Marshall 

Sewell c. Easton, b. Marshall 1 

Walker c. Ault, b. Marshall 

Little IL, c. Ault, b. Easton 5 

Green IL, not out. 12 

Extras 2 

48 



LOWER SCHOOL CRICKET. 

Cricket practice has been in full swing from the commencement 
of the term, and everyone has shown a keenness which has been 
m.ost commendable. Practically every day there have been three 
different games in progress and each player from the youngest up 
has held the hope that he might be tried out for the representation 
team of the Lower School. At the time of writing these notes 
there is still considerable doubt as to the final choice of two or 
three for the first team. Our prospects for a successful season 
appear to be very bright. The following matches have been ar- 
ranged : — 



ST. .A.XDkKW's coi.i.iiCK Ri:\ii:\\ 

May 27th— St. Andrew's L. S. vs. U.C.C, at U.C.C. 

May 30th. — St. Andrew's vs. U.C.C, on our grounds. 

June 2nd. — St. Andrew's vs. T.C.S., on our grounds. 

June 6th.— St. Andrew's vs. T.C.S., at Port Hope. 

June 7th. — St. Andrew's vs. Liike Lodge School, at Grimsbv. 



1 •^jp^jt^^^BfTbyjtyByJMjJ^ 


^^^ i^wStl^^fm^l^^- 





THIRD CRICKET TEAM 



LOWER SCHOOL VS. UPPER CANADA COLLEGE 
PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

The first match against the Preparatoiy School of Upper 
Canada College was played on the afternoon of May 27th on the 
Upper Canada College grounds. After winning the toss, we de- 
cided to bat first. Unaccustomed to playing on matting, we did not 
lilay with any confidence and were all dismissed for 33 runs. Cole- 
brook was the only boy to do himself justice. He made 14 runs 
m good style before being caught at square leg. 

Upper Canada College then went in and made 57 runs, Bagshaw 
and Doherty making 17 and 20, respectively. Stollmeyer IH., No- 
riega L and Noriega II. bowled well and sent down very few loose 
balls. 



ST. ANDRKW'S COl.LKC.K kK\ li:\\ 71 

In our second innings we played with much g-reater confidence. 
Murchison III. and Noriega I. made a good beginning; and after 
Murchison TIL left, Noriega I. and Stollmeyer III. scored freely 
and played excellent cricket. Colebrook again played well and was 
not out when the innings was declared closed at 73 for 5 wickets. 




LOWER SCHOOL CRICKET TEAM 

This left us with 45 minutes in which to win the game. Stoll- 
meyer III. and Noriega I. again bowled very well. The excitement 
towards the end was very great. Eight wickets had fallen; there 
were still six runs to make, and only a few minutes to play. Gil- 
mour, Matthews and Sly batted well for U.C.C., and owing to 
mistakes in the field w^e lost the match by 2 wickets. After a bad 
beginning, our boys did very well to make such a good fight for 
victory. Score : — 
Lower School — 

First innings • 33 

Second innings (for 5 wickets) 73 

U.C.C. Preparatory School — 

First innings 57 

Second innings (for 8 wickets) 50 



72 



ST. ANDRKW'S COLLECE RE\IR\V 



S. A. C. LOWER SCHOOL vs. U. C. C. PREP. 

On May 30th the Lower School phiyed a return game with U. 
C. C. Prep. School on S. A. C. grounds. Although they were beaten 
in the first innings at U. C. C. they showed better style in this game 
and came out well in the lead at the end of the first innings. Nor- 
iega II. showed excellent form and knocked out thirty-nine, while 
Murchison III. helped out with twenty-four. The total score was 
eighty-nine. Upper Canada got forty-three, Northgrave leading 
with a score of twenty-one. 

In the second innings the Lower School were a little bit excited 
and three batters were run out. However, they brought their 
former score up to a total of one hundred and nineteen. Upper 
Canada played much the same, and only bettered their formei" score 
by two runs, making a total of eighty-eight. 




THE FOURTH CRICKET TEAM 



Our Old Boys 



OLD BOYS* NEWS. 

The school learned with much pleasure of the success won by 
McTaggart. George was awarded the British Association Medal 
in Civil Engineering at McGill during the past year. Congratu- 
lations I 

Gordon Doolittle, who has been with the Burroughs Adding 
Machine Co., is now with Geo. B. Williams, selling real estate and 
insurance in Toronto. 

"Al" Beer, who has been at the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia, L(7S Angeles, is expected to be in Toronto on a trip this sum- 
mer. The school would be glad to welcome him. 

Gordon Hewitt is with George Lawrence during this summer. 

''Hal." Hunter has a position in St. Mary's. We hear that he is 
often in Toronto. 




THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATIOX EXECUTUE 1021-22 
7.S 



74 ST. ANDREW'S C0I.LE(;E RE\IE\V 

Doug. Gordon has joined the 18th Highlanders of Toronto. 
"Fat" Smith is also in the ranks. 

"Jimmie" Sloan is to go on a survey with the Cochrane and 
James Bay Railway. Address "Baffin's Land." 

The following are among those graduating from 'Varsity this 
year: Doug. Wood, Andy Curry, Roland McLaughlin, Joe Taylor. 
G. 0. Lightbourne, Doug. Wood, K. W. Cosgrave, D. H. Running, 
F. G. Lightbourn, Mr. Norman McD. Allen. 



MARRIAGES. 

Bole, W. Wilfrid, on June ord, 1922, to Miss Hermine Deeble, 
of Toronto. 

Clarke, Norman Dwight, on May 6th, 1922, to Miss Irene 
Rosamond Bi-ophey, of Montreal. 

Dand, Angus Chisholm, on April 27th, 1922, to Miss Sara 
Emeline Stewart, of New Glasgow, N.S. 

Fleming, Goldwin Orford, on June 1st, 1922, to Miss Anne 
Jean Ross, of Toronto. 

Jackes, Lyman B., on April 22, 1922, to Miss Ethel Parmenter 
Sutherland. 

Lytle, William Harold, on May 6th, 1922, to Miss Vivien Rus- 
sell Clarke, of Toronto. 

Lepper, Reginald H., on April 22nd, 1922. to Miss Beryl Louise 
Wheaton. 

MiLLiGAN, Capt. Franklin S., M.C, on April 17th, 1922 to 
Miss Norah Georgina Morton, at Windsor, Ont. 

Ramsey, Alan R., on April 8th, 1922. to Miss Marjorie Gordon 
Mills, of Toronto. 

Richardson, Frank B. C, on May 17th, 1922, to Miss Reita 
Taylor, of Portage la Prairie. 

Smith, J. Russell, on February 28th, 1922, to Miss Evelyn 
Gray, of Millbrook, Ont. 

McMURTY, Claude, on May 10th, 1922, to Miss Rosamond Den- 
ton, of Toronto. 



BIRTHS. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Brouse, on April 18th, 1922. a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Carlyle, on April 10th, 1922, a daugh- 
ter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. V. J. Diver, on March 27th, 1922, a son. 



ST. AXDRKW'S (-()LLP:GE REVIEW 



75 



To Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Findlay, on May 1st, 1922, a daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gooderham, Jr., on May 19th, 1922, 
a daughter. 

To Mr and Mrs. Henry Kent Hamilton, on May 19th, 1922, 
a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William B. McPherson, on May 7th, 1922. 
a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Guy W. Rutter, on May 26th, a son. 



OBITUARY. 

Barclay, Norman Howland, was born in Toronto, on July 
26th, 1886. He came up to St. Andrew's College in Septembe,]n, 
1901, and left at Christmas, 1902, in order to enter business with 
his father. Later he went to Peterboro to fill a position with the 
Canadian Tent and Awning Company, of which company he was 
President at the time of his death. 

On March 28th, 1922, he succumbed to an attack of pneumonia 
after a brief illness. 

Norman Barclay will be remembered with affectionate interest 
by those who knew him at St. Andrew's College, and the news of his 
death will be received with great regret by the Old Boys who were 
at school with him. 




•MIXED DOUBLES." 



76 . ST. AXDF^KWS COIA.FJ'.V. RK\"IR\V 

OX THE STREET. 

"Hello, Bill!" 

"Hello, Jack!" 

"Didn't see you at the Old Boys' dinner last night!" 

"No, I intended to go, but had to leave town unexpectedly. What 
was it like?'' 

"Huge success, of course. The Old Boys look forward to this 
Easter reunion from year to year. On account of the lateness of the 
season this year the 'Varsity boys taking exams, were not able to 
attend, but when we "numbered" around the table there wej'e over 
a hundred present. And each year was represented better than, 
ever before. The newer Old Boys, especially, were out in force. 

"Cxood!" 

"One new feature this year that took rather well was the plac- 
ing of cards dividing the table into five-year periods ; the idea being 
to group together the boys who attended the school at the same 
time. The table was mighty attractive, too, running along three 
sides of the dining hall and lavishly decorated with good old crim- 
son and white, and candles. And the dinner, Bill, surpassed all 
former ones by at least three courses. The catering " 

"Cease, you fill me with remorse!" 

"Theie was a good jazz orchestra in attendance which, in con- 
junction with the song sheets at each place, kept everyone swaying 
from the very start. Towards the close of the dinner copies of the 
two school songs, "Played St. Andrew's" and one bearing the title 
of the school motto, were distributed and the songs were tried out. 
These songs ai'e now sung by the school on most public occasions. 
This was the first time they have b^^en introduced to the Old Boys, 
and the assembly endorsed them with approval. 

After the toast to the King and the "minute of silence" in mem- 
ory of fallen Andreans, there v/as a nice little ceremony when 
Lyman Howe presented small tokens from the Old Boys to Miss 
Brooks, Miss McCollum and Mrs. Montgomery. Unfortunately, 
Mrs. Macdonald was unable to attend the dinner this year, and a 
formal message of regret was sent to her. 

The toasts were alternated by songs by Stan. Bennett, sung in 
his own original and inimical manner, and musical numbers by 
Fraser Allan. As Dr. Macdonald afterwards remarked, "the boys 
applauded the speakers and encored the entertainers." 

"Sounds like a jolly evening, all right. -Tack. What we>-e the 
toasts?" 



ST. ANDREW'S COLI.ECE RE\1E\V 77 

"Just a few. 'The School,' by Jack Hope, responded to by Dr. 
Macdonald and Bob Cxill ; 'The Old Boys,' by Mr. Robinson, re- 
sponded to by Lyman Howe and Reg. Morton, and, by request, a few 
words from Mr. Findlay, Mr. Fleming and Mr. Taylor." 

"Dr. Macdonald's remarks were of more than usual interest 
this year. He gave us a brief outline of his recent trip to the Head- 
masters' Conference in England. By the way, he was the only 
Canadian headmaster invited to attend. He spoke, also, of the 
school, its past, its aims, and ideals. He also outlined the plans for 
the new school building on the Yongo Street property. It is going to 
be some school, Bill. Then, by request, he explained the origin 
and plans of the 'insurance scheme' which has been proposed and is 
being put into operation by the Old Boys. Over a hundred thou- 
sand dollars ali'eady written up. Pretty good, eh!" 

"Yes, fine. Read about it in the Easter Review. I'm in." 

"Put mine on last week." 

"Well, after the dinner and the jazz and the toasts there wasn't 
much time left for the business meeting, but we elected the usual 
officers for the year. Lyman Howe, president, and Ed. Whittaker, 
Secretary. Felt we could not improve on them and re-elected them 
unanimously. The committee is going to arrange an Old Boys' 
dance, to be held at the college next winter. The present boys' 
Cadet Corps dance is usually heid in the Easter term, you know, and 
there is not I'oom to include the Old Boys' so we'll have one of our 
own next year." 

"That is a good idea, too. Jack. Well, I must be stepping along. 
How's the wife?" 

"She's well." 

"And the boy?" 

"He's well, too. St. Andrew's next year." 

"S'long, Jack!" 

"Good bye, Bill !" 




This time we received exchanges from Siam, China and Aus- 
tralia, but none from the United States, which seems a pit}-, for 
the magazines across the border often contain good suggestions. 
Evidently the photographers have not been busy during the last 
term, as snapshots are rare. Some of the papers were really ex- 
cellent. The Oakwood Oracle and St. Peter's College Magazine 
deserve special mention. 

The College Times : Upper Canada College. Your Easter num- 
ber is very good indeed. Congratulations on the success of your 
play. 

Macdonald College Magazine : Montreal. Some clever stories 
and articles make yours an interesting magazine. 

Trinity College School Record : An exchange column would en- 
courage other publications to make suggestions, which are often 
useful. A few short stories would add great interest. 

The High School Citizen : Dunkirk. Your effort to print only 
original jokes is very commendable. Our hearty congratulations 
on the success of your basketball team. 

The Argosy: Mount Allison University. The Shakespeare num- 
ber contains interesting reading. Your girls' debating team cer- 
tainly did well, and do honour to the Alma Mater. 

The Camosun : Victoria High School, B.C. Some good skits add 
colour to your paper. But there is very little real reading matter. 

Acadia Athenaeum : Your March and April issues are both ex- 
cellent. We know it was not the season for snapshots, but is there 
nobody at Acadia who can draw? 

Acta Ridleiana : Every department of school life is well dealt 
with in your very complete paper. 

78 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEC.E REVIEW 79 

The Branksome Slogan: We are glad to hear from you again. 
Yours is a pleasing and well-written magazine. 

Managra: Winnipeg;. Your graduation number has excellent 
and very interesting editorials. 

The Collegiate: Sarnia Coll. Inst. A very complete paper, 
managed with competence. You have an abundance of good stories. 

The Argus: Appleby School. Your March issue, although a 
bit short, contains some good jokes. 

The Mitre: Bishop's College. A few photographs might im- 
prove your paper. The editorial is very much to the point. We 
wish you luck for your ''Student Parliament." 

The Gateway : University of Alberta. A well-conducted, busi- 
ness-like paper. 

The Elevator: Belleville High School. Some of your form-re- 
porters show considerable poetic talent. 

The College News: Baujkek, Siam. The part of your maga- 
zine which we were able to read, seems to denote that your interests 
are much the same as those of most Canadian schools. We shall be 
glad to hear from you again. 

Boone Review: Boone University, China. The essays in your 
fiftieth anniversary issue, dealing on subjects of social and politi- 
cal interest, are the more interesting to us, as we are following 
events in China closely just now. We sincerely hope that your work 
of reform will be successful. 

Oakwood Oracle : Your editorials are full of common sense, and 
appear to voice the opinion of a body of students possessing school 
spirit and good will. 

St. Peter's College Magazine: Adelaide, Australia. A very 
complete, elaborate magazine, reflecting fine school spirit. You 
seem to have a great number of poets, and nearly all of them are 
good. 

J. E. Howell. 




THE HIGH BROWS. 

Tom: (Looking- at a grasshopper) — "Chippendale" 
Monte: "No, Tom, I should say that it was Sheraton, although 
it may be Valspar." 

Note: Tom will persist in referring to the knobs on the banis- 
ters as "gargoyles." 

1st Old Boy: "Yes, I'm selling fire insurance." 
2nd Old Boy: "What company?" 
1st Old Boy: "The safety match." 



Callighen: "Over at the baseball game the other day I stopped 
a pop fly with my mouth." 

Rowell: "You swallowed it." 

Callighen : "Yes, it was a bottle of ginger-ale." 



A COMMON-SENSE EDITORIAL 
By Moose Tartan. 

Good hard work will bring you success, my boy. If you apply 
yourself diligently to picking up cigarette butts you will eventually 
have enough to roll your own ; never let discouragement or im- 
prisonment or any vicissitudes short of the electric chair deter you 
irom the great goal — Success, where in the exuberance of wealth 

80 



ST. .WDF^KWS COLLKCK RK\IE\V 



SI 



untold sit Henry Ford and Rockefeller. If you would occupy a 
camp-stool beside their thrones find out the combination of the 
office safe; buy a straw suit case and a ticket to Nicaragua. 



HE, HAR! 

He was a dumbell, 

He never felt slighted 

When he went to a party 
Without being invited. 

Har was a rough-neck, 
His mind was quite nil. 

He could be requested to leave 
Without feeling the chill. 




SPORTS DAY. 

Mr. Laidlaw: "Who was Laura Secord?" 

Stollmeyer: "She poisoned the American army with chocolates, 
thus enabling the Canadians to win a victory dui'ing the war of 
1812." 



Duffus: (On Parade). — "Yeh, the sergeant wouldn't let me 
ground arms, so I ground my teeth." 



ODE. 
Your skin is dark 

To my ardent eye. 
But your heart is white, 

My ESKIMO PIE. 



n2 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE F<E\IE\V 

MIRRORS OF S.A.C., BY A BOY WITH IG HOURS' 
DETENTION. 

G. B. Russell: I often recall the occasion when I fell off of the 
roof at S. A. C, how tactful and sympathetic Russell was at thai 
time. When I flashed by his window he gazed at me sorrowfully 
and said. "Hard luck, old chap." — His noble words were still ring- 
ing in my ears when the ambulance called. 

Samuel de Beauregard: In mentioning this famous personage 
I have a little anecdote illusti'ating the more human side of his 
character. Just before he made his great sortie to the tuck-shop he 

called me aside and said, "Z , I'd like to treat you, but I've only 

got a nickel." His noble words touched me so that I replied, "Thank 
you, Sam, but I've got a dime myself." 

Sclatter : Often have I recalled my first meeting with him. I 
was coming up the stairs when he stepped on me. "Sorry, old 
chap," he said, and passed on. 

Harve Draper: When Draper was in kindergarten I knew him; 
then, just as now, he was noted for his sense of humour. Many a 
time when the teacher accidentally sat on a tack he would laugh at 
the humour of the situation. And I am glad to say that this attitude 
has remained with him. He is always the first to congratulate the 
mourners at a funeral. 




ST. AXDRKW'S COI.LECK RFAIEW 



83 



HOOT MON. 

Why doesn'a' he cough? 
Why doesn'a' he sneeze? 
The bonny wee Scot 
With braw bare knees. 
What is his name, 
This Scotchman so braw? 
John Archibald Cameron 
From auld Ottawa. 





DUMBELLS. 
Sapp: "Why won't they let Mohawks into Chllds?" 
Yapp: "Because they are afraid of it becoming an Indian Club. 



FAMOUS ONE-MAN ACTS. 

Peace as the boy detective. 

Harve Draper impersonating Peck's Bad Boy. 

Bill Easton in his supreme drama, "One of the Boys." 

Willy Murchison as the Branksome god-father. 

"Ed. Morton of the Red Triangle." 

R. H. Anderson as Roth the Memory Expert. 

Mike Tucker as Valentino. 



84 ST. ANDRKWS (T)LLEGE REVIEW 

Humphreys: "Does my uniform fit me?" 
Sprott: "Like a glove — a boxing glove." 



Carrick (on seeing Howell's silver cup) : "Ah, ha, a new recep- 
tacle for my collar buttons !" 



THE BAT. 

A Play of Revenge. 

Act I. 

Characters: Bruce Findlay, Richard Fisher, Glenn Lumbers, 
and McRae L, while Robert Anderson is present as an embodied 
spirit and as a corpse. 

Scene: Cricket field, Bruce Findlay with cricket bat conversing 
with Richard Fisher. 

Richard: "Ha, Bruce, hast seen Bawb Anderson upon the 
gi'een sward?" 

Bruce : "Had I seen him he would be under the green sward, 
know that he is my uncompromising rival." 

Richard: "In what?" 

Bruce: "In cricket." 

Exeunt Fisher — A flourish. 

Enter Glenn Lumbers. 

Author's Note : As Lumbers is a bold fellow he speaks in prose 
— yours. Bill Shakespeare. 

Lumbers : "Bawb Anderson is lamming the pill around five hun- 
dred to-day; he just broke the City Hall clock." 

Bruce: "He'd stop an Ingersoll." 

Lumbers: "Ah, the jealous heart hands out the lemon-skin 
instead of the verdant laurel." 

Bruce: "How so, don't I admit that Wallace Reid is in my 
class?" 

Lumbers: "Pardon, Bruce, your nobleness makes me feel like an 
eskimo pie in a fireman's pocket." 

Bruce : "But as to this fellow Anderson having a higher 
cricket batting average than I — well, we shall see. 

Exeunt both. 



ST. ANnRKW'S COl.I.KC.E Kr:\IE\V 85 

Act II. 

Great excitement in front of tuck-shop. Three flourishes. En- 
ter Lumbers, Fisher, Findlay and McRae I. (They see Anderson's 
body lying half in and half out of the waste basket on the front 
porch. 

McRae I. : "Ho, strange for Hadwin to take his siesta in this 
position. "(He goes forward and removes a pop bottle, two banana 
peels and^a chocolate wrapper from the inanimate form — he gives 
a terrific start. "Ho, he moves not, he is croaked, he is no more! !" 

(All remove their hats.) 

Lumbers: "Who has handed Bawb the lead pipe? Look, his 
skull is riven like a master's gown !" 

Fisher (playing Sherlock) : "Ha, the victim's skull smells of 
brilliantine!" 

(He smells Findlay's cricket bat which he holds in his hand) — 
"Ha, the odours are identical. Inhuman wretch!" 

Lumbers: "What then, has ended the hopeful life of Robert 
Anderson ?" 

Fisher (pointing to Findlay) : "That jealous wretch, driven 
to desperation by the victim's superiority at cricket, he handed him 
the cracked egg with his bat." 

All: "The bat, it was the bat!!" 
Enter Mclnerney with hand-cart to remove the body. They seize 
the criminal and chain him to the roller standing near by. 

A freight train goes by blotting out the sad scene. 

Curtain. 



A ballad demonstrating the presence of Rhyme without Reason 
Bring to me, pal, yon cornet. 
And while you play sweet chords 
I'll take my hat (I've worn it 
For fifteen years in Foi-ds), 
And sing to you a story 
Of how I got this way 
Through a struggle long and gory 
With a dentist in Bombay. 

'Twas on a midnight starry. 
While I toured the turbid Nile 
That I held up a Pharry 
And relieved him of his pile. 



86 



ST. A.XDRK\\-S COLl.KC-,F, F^H\!K\V 



When moons crashed over Heaven 
In a swirl of ions cold, 
And the hoboe's shirt was riven 
With a nineteen-inch long hole. 

Envoi. 

And the deacon's horse was driven 
From North to Southern Poles, 
And three hearty cheei's were given 
For the proprietor of Bowles. 



K. B. C. 




WILLIAM'S' HfiRT 



TERM DIARY. 

April 20. — Charley Lewis makes public his determination not 
to return next year. 

April 22. — Belton Cochrane bori'ows a necktie. 

April 30. — Ferguson I. complimented for his good class work. 
Ferguson I. goes to sickroom, is treated for shock. 

May 2. — Charley Lewis makes public his determination not to 
return next year. 

May 4. — Arbor Day : Thurber washes. 
May 10. — Flaunt goes to the sickroom leaving his wardrobe for 
the use of his fellow Ottawites. 



ST. AXDRKWS COI.l.KCK RK\II-:\V 87 

May 21. — Belton Cochrane returns eleven neckties. 

May 24. — Holiday. Belton Cochrane borrows three neckties, a 
suit, a shii't, a collar, but very munificently provides own B.D.V.'s. 
Charley Lewis admits that it is his last 24th at the school. McRae 
attempts suicide at Niagara. 

May 30. — Anderson sends out two class-pins by parcel post. 

May 31. — Anderson receives two class pins by parcel post. 

June 3. — Cricket game, two boys overcome by excitement faint; 
a fast game on a slippery field. 

June 10th. — Charley Lewis declines to discuss plans for next 
year. 

June 19th. — Matric. begins; everyone supremely confident, in- 
cluding McRae. 

July 5th. — Boys reluctantly are forced to vacate the school. 
Charley Lewis weeps on the front steps. 



Mr. Laidlaw : "What musical instrument did the early English 
favour?" 

Geddes: "The Anglo-Saxophone, sir." 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 
JOKAL Training : You must train your voice ; I can sing, why 
cant you? — Hink Russell. 

Physical Seltzer: Sandow sandbagged and Strongfort 
strangled! Would you like to see a loved one relieved of twenty-five 
cents while you leaned against a fire hydrant, powerless? — Try my 
physical enei-vator. — Willie Murchison (The Branksome Battler). 

Hot Dogma: Train announcers earn good money! Take my 
course. — Frederick Ferguson. 



Noonan: "I bet you cut a lot of ice in Newfoundland?" 
Moores : "Not so very much, but I shovel a lot of snow." 



THE FIRST YANK-CRACK. 

Noah (looking at the elephant) : "You remind me of Blauvelt." 



TWO GUESSES. 

Why do the buildings around Barrie assume that sunset glow 
soon after Cully Wilson hits town? 



88 ST. .WDRKWS COl.l.FJ.K Ul-'AI i:\\ 

The sea-going Newfoundlanders will persist in referring to 
spinach as sea-weed. 



Red Milton Says: 

"Oh, to be there now!" "Where Red?" 
Where the ladies still wear 
The wide antique hoops, 
Where the guys eat nails raw. 
In woolly Kamloops. 



Geddes: "I put a dollar bill in a blind-man's hat this morning." 

McMurtry: "How I'eckless." 

Geddes: "Yes, but I took a dollars' worth of change out." 



THE PASS MATRICULATION IN FINNISH. 

(1) How do you say in Finnish, "How come?" 

(2) Give the participles present or absent of the verb "allwet" 
="to go swimming." 

(3) Translate into Finnish : "I go to church, but I seldom put in 
any collection." Give the past definite of "Loosenup=to put in 
collection." 

(4) Translate into English: Hock, Hock Skagway, clicquot. Hog- 
lied barnstrum wa wei weh : note: use future conditional instead 
of past anterior in all cases except in the astronomical conjugations 
of the pronoun Hogtied^^It (meaning a gating) . 

(5) Give the following idioms in Finnish : 

(1) Half a league, half a league. 

(2) Just take two hours. 
(8) We hate ourselves. 
(4) Attaboy, Hank. 

Warning: The student is forbidden to bring into the class- 
room any Finnish exercise book. Those caught with sardine labels 
in ther possession will be prevented from finishing the examina- 
tion. K. B. C. 



Robinson : "I beat up on the king this morning." 

Moore: "Spring it." 

Robinson: "I licked a postage stamp." 



ST. AXDRHWS COLLECJ': RKVIHW 89 

Andy says: "Borrow the dollars and let the pikers take care 
of themselves." 



A NERVIST MONOLOGUE. 

"Good afternoon, just thought I'd drop around, oh, yes, I'm quite 
well and studying- hard. Oh, no, I couldn't think of staying to tea, 
no indeed, I had no idea it was so late, I thought it was about three 
Well, if you insist, but I feel it is an imposition. Two please, I'm 
sweet enough, ha, ha!" 



Drury: (nervously). — "I think I hear your father coming down- 
stairs." 

Girl: "Go earlv and avoid the rush." 



JEALOUSY OVER THE STYX. 

Addison: (to Richard Steele)— "I'll tell the world, Dick, that 
Ropo Dayment has j^ou and I and the Spectator backed off the map." 

Voice of Pope : "Yes, old dears, and Tom Aspden has been run- 
ning me oft' the paddock." 

Voice of Holbien: "That fellow Anderson has me looking like 
Bud Fisher." 

Voice of Johnston: "Yes, Bozzy, old scout, Murchison I. has me 
looking like a Bowles toothpick for vocabulary." 



GOLUF. 

Scotch golf has been taken up again at the school. I say Scotch 
to distinguish it from t'he more popular African game introduced 
by the head hunters of the Congo. On any evening now Ted Bir- 
kett can be heard crying, "Hoot mon tha' wa' a fine drive!" The 
game provides some fine problems in division as about six boys 
have clubs, while about thirty play. 



Belton Cochrane (making long dive after a piece of bread across 
the table)— "Fore!" 



There was a young golfer called Grant, 
With knickers that looked like one pant 
In making long drives 
He endangered the lives 
Of two bumble bees and one ant. 



What a])out prefects caddying for the boys? 



<l() 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE RE\1E\\ 



EXTRACTS FROM JOCK DE VALERA'S "TALKS OX GOLF." 

The knock-kneed person has a distinct advantage in his stance 
when addressing- the ball, while a cross-eyed person may slice and 
yet make a perfect drive ; physical disability is a distinct advantage 
in golf (have one ear amputated if you are ambitious). Cricket 
players should never play golf as the unaccustomed activity might 
prove their undoing. — Jock. 

To-morrow — Putting with a caddy, by Jock. 



/ 




.^P. 



Mashie: "Yeh, I got a brother who is a fine driver. 
Niblick: "What club does he play for?" 
Mashie: "The Yellow Cab Line." 



He violated every rule of golf; he used a right handed club, 
although he was left handed ; he made mashie shots with a putter 
and putted with a driver; one would have thought that he couldn't 
play golf at all. ... He couldn't. 



WHY HE GAVE UP GOLF. 

He didn't have a club. 

He had no golf-balls. 

He couldn't play for beans. 

And he fiked parchesi better anway. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



1 ^ 



^t ^ntireto'5 College 



A ^ 



^CorontD 



4 u 

" : 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS ^ 

o 



^ 



CHAIRMAN: 



J. K. Macdonald, Esq. f 



VICE-CHAIRMAN: 
Colonel Albert E. Gooderham 



GOVERNORS: 



Rev. Prof. Kilpatrick, D.D. " 

Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D. 

Sir Joseph W. Flavelle, Bart. 

D. B. Hanna, Esq. 

Frank A. Rolph, Esq. 

A. M. Campbell, Esq. \ 

H. E. Irwin, Esq., K.C. f 

D. A. Dunlap, Esq. 

Ralph Connable, Esq. ^ 

T. A Russell, Esq. 

W. B. McPherson, Esq. 

Albert E. Gooderham, Jr., Esq. 

Lyman P. Howe, Esq. 

Kenneth B. MacLaren, Esq. 

Robert J. Gill, Esq. 



" 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




Candies and Ice Cream 

Main Store: YONGE & BLOOR STS 

(Tea Rooms in Connection) 

Other Stores: 

245 AVENUE RD. 500 BLOOR ST. WEST 

1200 ST. CLAIR AVE. 



-arg- !s-^ 



We do catering for banquets, etc. 



:Bii 



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TRINITY UNIVERSITY 

TORONTO 

federated with the University of Toronto, offers 

1. All the achantages of a complete Residental System for men and 
wtjmen in separate buildings. 

2. A full Arts course leading to the degree of B.A. (University of 
Toronto). 

3. Courses in Divinity leading to the degree of L.Th. and B.D., in 
preparation for the Ministry of the Church of P2ngland in Canada. 

4. Six Matriculation scholarships in Classics, Modern Languages, 
English and History, Mathematics and Science. 

A)!y of twenty-nine Matriculation scholarships are tenable at Trinity 

For rooms and information app!\' to 

THE REVD. C. A. SEAGER, M.A.. D.D. 

Provost, Trinity Colleg"e. Toronto. 

srt% E- sraa g- 



ST. AM)Ri:\\"S COLLECrP: REVIEW 



St. Andrew's Boys! 



y 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



They ma/^e it possible for us to publish the 
"Review" and are deserving of ])our support. 

^ffita-g- -aatg- -a g- -a-g- ^w 

-mw-r- -aw-g- :a-g- -a g — ^g 

Pi£if)op J^etljune College I] 

OSA/>llV>1 ONTARIO i^ 

X'isiTOR — The Lord Bishop of Toronto 

A Residental School for Girls between the ages of 6 and 18 

PREPARATION FOR THE UXUERSITV 

Toronto Conservatory Degree A.T.C.M. may be taken at the school 

Art Department, including drawing and design, painting, wood carving, modelling and 

D needlework. Fine healthful situation. Tennis, basketball, skating, snow-shoeing and 

other outdoor games. 
SCHOOL RE-OPENS SEPT. 14th. For terms and particulars apply to the Head 
Mistress at Oshawa or to the Sisters of Sr. John the Divine. Major Street. Toronto. 

»g g- ^ g- -a g- ^ w 'g' ^ ww g- ^ w g- ^ g^ s- g TT xa 



Distinctive Stales, High-grade Fabrics 



1 Perfect Tailoring, Reasonable Prices 

All these features go to make the great popularity 
u enjoyed bv 

1 



"Cambridge Clothes 

You will find a splendid ran§e of real clothes values ready 
for your selection when you call and courteous attention 
" will be paid to your every requirement. 

li Be Abreast of the Times — Wear "Cambridge Clothes'' 

i ' 

FITZPATRICK & O'CONNELL 

LIMITED 
254 YONGE STREET - Just North of Shuter 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



(glen ilator 

^ 651 SPADINA AVENUE, TORONTO 

'■ Residential and Day School for Girls 

Principal-MISS J. J. STUART 

(Successor to Miss Veals) 
Classical Tripos. Cambridge University. Knglaiiit. Large well-veiitilated house, pleasantly 
situated. Highly qualified staff of Canadian .ind Europe.in teachers. The curriculum 
shows close touch with modern thought and education. Preparation for matriculation 
e.xaminatioMs. Special attention given to individual needs. Outdoiir games. 

School Re-opens September 20th 

\e«' Pro.spectiis from .Miss Stuart 



Telephone Adelaide 102 

The Macoomb Press 



Printing 

4 THAT GETS RESULTS 



16 JOHNSON STREET TORONTO 

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Office Phone M. 2877 Warehouse M. .Vi.Sli Produce .M. ■2390 

STRONACH & SONS 

WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits Butter, Eg'gfs, Produce oi' all Kinds 

.Apples and Potatoes in Car Lots 



'MW. 



LET THE 

British-American Cleaners and Pressers 

LOOK AFTER YOUR CLOTHES 

Our Special Students Contracts at S5.00 for 12 Suits. Guarantees Satisfaction. 
SUITS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED. 

485 SPADINA CRESCENT Phone College 5390 

^w g- -a-tata -g^ ^ ta -g- s- g- ,3 g ^ g 



ST. A.NDKLWS C()1.LE(,E RKVIKW 



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mm: 



Toronto Auto Accessories 

LIMITED 



N. 4292 



J. S. GREEN. 
S.A.C.. '07-'08 



M S. GOODERHAM. 
S.A.C.. 'OI-'IO 



JUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT [ 



598 YoNGE Street 



[g g .a gg] 



JESS 

APPLEOATH 

HATS 

SURPASS 
ALL OTHERS 



I 85 Yonge St. 

Sold only ' Near King St. 

at I 280 Yonge St. 

' At Alice St, 
Montreal Store 

473 St. Catherine St. W. 

Near Peel St. 



g:z: 



Beatty U 
Knitting Mills fi 



Limited 



Manufacturers o f V-Neck I 

and Roll-Collar Sweaters, u 
Sweater Coats and Athletic 

Stockings for Clubs and M 

Colleges. f| 

In PmelWool Only. ii 

54=56 Wolseley Street [j 

TORONTO h 

Phone College 4148 

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ST. ANDREW'S COl.l.KC.E l<i:\li;\V 



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CH£/^/^ r FL/P 



ROBERTSON BROS. LTD. 
TORONTO 



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zubsb:: 



2:s!: 




Economy and Comfort 

^" DacJ^s 

SPORT SHOES 



If you are out of town, 
write for our new style 
book and self -measure- 
ment chart. 



They are cool, comfortable 
and dressy. 

Moreox'er, they wear better 
and last longer — 

In sport shoes and shoes for 
every wear, we can guarantee 
satisfaction to St. Andrew's 
College men and their friends. 



R.DACK&SONSD^eiED 

MAKERS OF MENS SHOES 
FOR OVER ICO YEARS 

73W.KINGST. TORONTO 



Branch: 310 Fort Street, Winnipeg 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



^:s 



Men's Furnishings [ 



Direct Importers of all kinds 
of Men's Furnishings of (he 
:: :: very best quality :: :: 

SHIRTS MADE TO MEASURE 

An excellent stock to 
choose from 

Gloves, Socks, Ties, House Coats 
Underwear, Etc. 

At Lowest Possible Prices 

COOPER & 00. 

67 & 69 King St. East 

TORONTO 



y 



mis 



ons 

Tennis 



Supplies 



Select your Racket from 
the splendid range of models 

'^ we are now showing of 
Wright & Ditson, Slazenger 

j and Risely Hexagon Models 
You will find a Racket that 
suits your play perfectly in 
model, quality and price. 



Call or write for our New Catalogue 
of Summer Sports 

The HAROLD A. WILSON Co. Ltd 

299 YONGE ST., TORONTO 



3c:s 



2cs: 



iscn: 



W. H. COX COAL CO. LTD, 



Phone Main 6075 



Wholesale Dealers Urge Householders to tr^ 

AMBRICOAL, The Perfect Anthracite Briquet, 

Ask Your Dealer 



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CANADA BROKERAGE CO. 

LIMITED 



D 



Wholesale Grocers 

Main 2281-2-3 
59-63 Front St, E. : : 

— ^ g -a g ^w g -a WW g 



TORONTO 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



li 



RELAX GARTER 

FOR MEN 

DOES NOT BIND 
ADJUSTS ITSELF 



COMFORTAIU.E 
RELL\BLE DURABLE 



SLIP ON A PAIR OF RELAX IN' THE 
MORNING AND IT WILL FAITHFULLY 
HOLD UP YOUR SOCKS ALL DAY WITH- 
OUT GrV'lNG YOU THE LEAST TROUBLE. 

THE SOFT WIDE WEBBING DOES NOT 
BIND YOUR LEG AND NO UNTASTEN- 
ING POSSIBLE. 

GET A PAIR OF RELAX AT 
ONCE AND BE CONVINCED 



35c. in Lisle. 



50c. in Mercerser. 



Eisman & Company, Ltd., Toronto 

Makers 



Bis: 



zcs: 



zxs: 






2::^ 



13::^ 



■z^-xz. 



325 



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Ice Saves Food \ 

JT starts to pay for 
itself as soon as 
the first piece goes 
into your refriger- 
ator. It stops waste; 
it saves time and 
trouble. No house- 
holder can afford to 
be without it. 

Telephone Main 86 

Lake Simcoe Ice Co. 



^LJ^ 



I.iin'itfd 






THE LUMSDEN BLDG. 

BARBER 
SHOP 

YONGE and ADELAIDE 

(Basement) 



8 



CHAIRS 

Absolutely Sanitary 



The barbers of this establishment 
are authorized by the proprietor 
to refuse to shave or do any work 
on customers whose faces or 
scalps give any evidence of in- 
fection whatever. Main 2535 



y 
" 

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os: 



=1:2= 



2cx: 



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ISO 



F. A. BowDEN & Sons 

Established 1880 
Phone Gerrard 220—221 

Retail Lumber 

LATH, SHINGLES, 

SHEETING, SHELVING, 

CRATING, FLAG POLES, 

BEAVER BOARD, Etc. 

Old Boys 

FRAXK G. BOWDEX 
HARRY V. BOWDEX 
ARTHUR (Pat) BOWDEX 

Greenwood Ave. G.T.R. Tracks 

stop 31 Yonge St. 

TORONTO 



Branch: Lansing, Ont. 



W^ 



^O^ 



^:ez 



2:h 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



-arww g sw g -^g- -a-g ^m 



Cf)e Bnibersittj) of l^oronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) 

With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and its special 
departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 

COMMERCE Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc. 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chcm.E. 

MEDICINE M.B., B.Sj.. (Med.) & M.D. 

EDUCATION B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

FORESTRY B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC Mus.Bac. and Mus.Doc. 

PUBLIC HEALTH D.P.H. (Diploma). 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW LL.B., LL.M., & LL.D. (Hon.) 

DENTISTRY D D.S 

AGRICULTURE B.S.A. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE B.V.S., and D.V.S. 

PHARMACY Phm.B. 

Teachers' Classes, Correspondence Work, Summer Sessions, Short Courses for 
Farmers, for Journalists, in Town-Planning and in Household Science, Univer- 
sity Classes in various cities and towns. Tutorial Classes in rural and urban com- 
munities, single lectures and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by 
the Department of University Extension. (For information, write the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the Registrar, University 
of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges or Faculties. 



^ g- =» g ^ B1E=^ ^ ww -g -a a;-g- a g- -ar-g- 



2:s: 



Percy A. McBride 

SPORTING GOODS 



SEE OUR 1922 LINES 



1 CRICKET - TENNIS - GOLF 

BASEBALL - - CANOES 
FISHING TACKLE - ETC. 



CATALOGUES ON REQUEST 



343=345 Yonge St. Toronto 

Phone Ad. 6450 



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ST. ANDREW'S UjUAJ^E RKVIKW 



'JB W. 



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Eclipse 
Cakes 



for Quality and ti 
Flavour y 



Manufactured by 

ECLIPSE BAKERY 

J-irnited 

TORONTO 



WHITE & CO. 

IIMITKI) 

( lMir< li MdfJ Front Sis. 
Jf>Hf>NIO 

Direct Importers from all 

p^rts of tK': world 

Fruits. Nuts, Vegetables, 
Etc. 



Also 

Wholesale Fish Dealers 

Iregh and Salt Water Fish 
Finnan Haddie, Etc. 

Best facilities for the prompt despatch 
of orders. 

ALSO BRANCH AT HAMILTON 




We darn your hose 
Repair your clothes 
and sew on buttons 

FREE 



AIJ, WORK I^O.Sri"IVKI,Y GUARANTEED 



Puritan Laundry Co., Limited |j 

2U2 Hriiiiswic'k Av<'. :: :: Toronto 



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ST. ANDRlCWh COLLEGE RKVTKVV 



When You Want the Real Thln^ 
in Athletic Equipment Look for 
this Trade Mark 




// Stands for the Bfst and Guarantees Satisfaction and Service 



Baseball, Tennis, Cricket and Golf Supplies, Sweaters, lerseys, etc. 

(ATAI.OlilK MAII.KI) ON KKIJIKSI 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS, 

OF (ANAnA. IJIMIIKU 

207 Yonge Street Toronto 



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MISS STERNBERG 

Modern Dancing 

Aura l.<-<> 

205 Avenue Rd. 



N. ~16« 



Year hook on application 

All the New Season's 

Steps in Fox Trot 

and Waltz 



PARK BROS. 

Groups 

a 

Specialty 



i 328', YONGE STREET 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1269 



ST. ANDREW'S COLI.EGE REVIEW 






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TORONTO 



Every College Boy 
in Canada knows 
this mark It means 
the Smartest Clothes 
made in Canada. 

THE 

LOWNDES COMPANY 

LIMITED 

142-144 West Front St. 

TORONTO 



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Phones 

Main i I^no Established .88. 

GALLAGHER & CO. 

LIMITED 

Direct Importers cnid Distributors 

of 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

FISH and OYSTERS 

to 

Hotels, Clubs and Restaurants 

Hospitals and Colleges 

Railway Dining Cars 
Supplies 

107 KING ST. EAST 
TORONTO 



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YOU EAT A 



CHRISTIE BISCUIT 



YOU EAT THE BEST 



CHRISTIE, BROWN & CO., LTD., TORONTO : 



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ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



THE STATIONERY 

IN THE BLUE BOX 



Si m 

1 




WEBB'S 

„ Great New Bakery 



GAGE'S HOLLAND LINEN 



The distinctive writing paper for social 

correspondence. 

A I all good dealers. 

W. J. GAGE & CO. LTD. 

TORONTO -:- WINNIPEG 



DAVENPORT ROAD 

Foot of Maimer Kd. II!II 



Finest in Canada 

h ELECTRIC DELIVERY 



No Stable No Horses 
No Odors 

The Harry Webb Co., Ltd. 



TELEPHONE 
UILLCREST 



5000 



2:sis: 






CRICKET, BASEBALL 

AND LACROSSE SUPPLIES 

NEW SPRING AND 

SUMMER 

FOOTWEAR 



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" 



J. BROTHERTON 






PHONE N. 2092 



580 YONGE ST. 



2LB!s: 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






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H. P. Eckardt & Co 

Wholesale Grocers 



Church Street 

and 

Esplanade 

TORONTO 



Telephone 
MASN 4168 



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HENRY Si'ROATT. L.L.D., R.C.A. 

ERNEST K. ROLPH. n 

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36 NORTH STREET 
TORONTO 



Brown Bros. 

Limited 



1 and 3 St. Lawrence Market 

Main 868 
Main 869 



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DEALERS IX 

i All kinds of Fresh and Salt 
Meats, Hams and Bacons 



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Corned Beef a Specialty 
A 11 Kinds of Poultry in Season 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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COLES 



Caterer 

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MANUFACTURING 
CONFECTIONER t 






Catering a Specialty 



PHONE N. 154 

719 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO 



TAYLOR & CO. 



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Painters 

and 

Decorators 



9 BLOOR ST. EAST L 
TORONTO 

Phone North 963 



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DANCING LESSONS 

Private, Class, Single, Group and Couples 

IN ADDITION TO THE LATEST BALL ROOM 
DANCES INSTRUCTION IS ALSO GIVEN IN 

CLASSICAL, NATURAL and CLOG 

FORM YOUR CLASSES— NOW 



THE 



MOSHER STUDIOS 



OF 



DISTINCTIVE DANCE CRAFT 

North 4530 :: 63 Avenue Road 



aSTS 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



We Want to See Every One 

of Our St. Andrew Friends 

Before Next Term 

Before you go away for the summer we'd like to 
show you our fine range of holiday things, White ducks, 
Khaki ducks, Bathing suits, Running shoes— everything! 

And by the time you are ready for school again in 
the Fall, we'll have a large stock of new up-to-date suits, 
overcoats and accessories worth coming to see. 

DOX'T FORGET! 

MURRAY=KAY 

Company, Limited 
** BOY'S SHOP" 

KING AND MCTORIA STREBTS. TORONTO 



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Blachford 
Shoes 
For Men 



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are wonderfully economical because 
they keep their smart appearance 
long after cheaper shoes must be 
repaired or replaced. 

Try them next time ! 



H. & C. Blachford 

LIMITED 

286YongeSt.,opp.DundasE. 



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TWO STORES 



BOND BROS. 

2)rUQtVL6t0 



453 YONGE STREET 

Phone North 350 

Cor. MADISON AVE. 

and DUPONT ST. 

Phone Hillcrest 812 

TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



i CANADIAN I 

GOVERNMENT 

^ MUNICIPAL AND M 

CORPORATION 

BONDS " 

\{ Bought, Sold and Quoted L 

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Dominion Securities 
corporation limited 



26 KING ST. EAST :: TORONTO 

MONTREAL LONDON, ENG. 



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Boys— 



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Your whole future will be affected by the habits 



II which you form to-day. U 

i\ To learn the value of thrift and acquire the habit " 

of saving is just as necessary to success as is 

J knowledge. I 

'\ We invite you to open a savings account here — f 

it will encourage you to save systematically. 

' CENTRAL CANADA 

LPAN AND SAVINGS 

COMPANY 



i King & Victoria Sts. Toronto. \ 



King & Victoria Sts. Toronto. 

ESTABLISHED 1884 



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ST. ANDRi:VV'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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CONFEDERATION LIFE ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

are issued providing in addition to all the regular benefits that 

'"or Total and Permanent Disability illlur^d 

L Ail future premiums are canxelled 

2. A reguxar monthly income will be paid the assured 

3. The full amount of the po:,icy will be paid at maturity 



The Association also issues policies on first-class lives for 

$2,000.00 or less Without Medical Examination [ 



FULL INFORMATION SENT UPON llEQUEST 

CONFEDERATION LIFE 

ASSOCIATION 

HEAD OFFICE : : TORONTO 



J. K. MACDONALD 

President 



JOSEPH HENDERSON, ESQ. 
COL. A. E. GOODERHAM 

Vice-Presidents 



C. S. MACDONALD 

General Manager 



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Buy 

COWAN'S 

CHOCOLATE 

BARS 



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They Are Delicious! 



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J3UARANTEED^ 
PRODUCTS 



Dear Friends, 

When buying any article your desire is to get VALUE, 
APPEARANCE, and a fully GUARANTEED article that 
is made by a reliable manufacturer. 

We realize these important facts, and have been success- 
fully manufacturing along these ideals for thirty- two years. 

We manufacture and GUARANTEE the following: 
HERCULES Bed Spring, Guaranteed for 26 years. 
GOLD MEDAL Felt Mattress ($22.60 anywhere in 

Canada and shipped in a sealed dust-proof 

carton) . 
GOLD MEDAL Divanette — The most practical and 

perfect Divanette on the market. Ask for 

demonstration. 
The GOLD MEDAL Phonograph, "the Instrument 

of Distinction." 
GOLD MEDAL Upholstered Furniture, including 

Chesterfields, Cane Suites, Davenports, Parlor 

Suites, and Den Sets. Made in any covering. 

The articles mentioned above are fully GUARANTEED 
and each article bears our GOLD MEDAL trade-mark, so 
look for the trade-mark before buying. Any reliable dealer 
will show you our trade-mark. 

The GOLD MEDAL line is long, but the key-note of 
the GOLD MEDAL organization of factories is SPECIAL- 
IZATION, and each article is made in its own factory, or 
department, by expert and skilled artisans in the particular 
line concerned. 

By centralized control of administration, buying of raw 
materials and merchandising the GOLD MEDAL Products, 
great savings are passed on to you (the consumer). 

When they have proved "Best by Test" for over thirty 
years, dont you think it is sufficient reason for a purchaser to 
demand the GOLD MEDAL trade-mark when buying? 
Yours truly. 

The Gold Medal Furniture Manufacturing Co. Ltd. 

TORONTO UXBEIDGE WINNIPEG 

The Gold Medal Bedding Co., Ltd. - - - MONTREAL 



perfects 
your home 



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Every house should be piped for Gas. 
It's almost as essential for comfort and 
convenience as doors and windows and 
a roof. 

Gas the ever popular fuel is so clean 
and dependable, is a form of heat 
always on tap, and used by the whole 
household in various ways. 

A full line of modern up-to-date gas 
appliances, GAS RANGES - FIRES 
WATER HEATERS - FIXTURES 
ETC. - etc., are always on view at our:- 



NEW DISPLAY ROOMS 

55 Adelaide Street East 

Telephone Adel. 2180 



The Consumers' Gas Company 



OF TORONTO